Treasure Island

By Robert Louis Stevenson; Frank Godwin | Go to book overview

GLOSSARY
Page 4 line 6 -- Capstan: A cylinder mounted on a vertical spindle and containing
sockets for levers (capstan bars). Sailors turn this
cylinder by means of these bars and thus raise the
anchor or other heavy weight.
" 4 " 10 -- Connoisseur: One well versed in a subject.
" 8 " 22 -- Dry Tortugas: Coral reefs near the coast of Florida.
" 12 " 3 -- Assizes: A sitting of court.
" 18 " 14 -- Chine: Back bone.
" 21 " 5 -- Buccaneer: A pirate.
" 23 " 10 -- Noggin: A mug.
" 24 " 27 -- Pipe all hands: Call by bugle or whistle.
" 24 " 28 -- Lay 'em aboard: Get them together.
" 37 " 1 -- Quadrant: An instrument used at sea for finding the altitude of the
sun and hence the position of the ship.
" 37 " 2 -- Canikin: A small can or cup.
' 39 " 26 -- Doubloons: Spanish gold coins.
Louis-d'ors: French gold coins.
" 39 " 27 -- Guineas: English gold coins.
Pieces of eight: Spanish coins.
" 43 " 18 -- Alow and aloft: Above and below.
" 72 " 10 -- Old Bailey: A famous London Court house and prison.
" 72 " 11 -- Bow Street: A London Street on which the police court stands.
" 81 " 24 -- Forecastle: A small upper deck in front for observation. The part
of a ship in front of the foremast where the crew eats
and sleeps.
" 86 " 20 -- Coxswain: The steersman of a boat.
" 86 " 25 -- Lanyard: A short piece of rope used on a ship.
" 89 " 25 -- Duff: (Dough) Pudding.
" 103 " 27 -- Snack: A small lunch.
" 110 " 1 -- Scuppers: An opening in a ship's side to let water falling on deck
run off.
" 111 " 10 -- Con: To direct the steering of a ship.
" 111 " 14 -- Scour: Current.
" 130 " 2 -- Stone: A stone of cheese is a weight of 16 pounds.
" 132 " 13 -- Clove hitch: A term used by sailors for a kind of knot in rope.
" 141 " 8 -- Jolly-boat: A boat of medium size belonging to a ship.
" 142 " 11 -- Painter: A rope at the bow of a boat.
" 142 " 22 -- Gigs: Long, fast boats.
" 155 " 27 -- Ricochet: A rebound or skipping of a ball along the ground or water

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