The Riddle of the Sands: A Record of Secret Service

By Erskine Childers; David Trotter | Go to book overview

NAUTICAL GLOSSARY
astern in or at the stern (rear) of the ship
bilge the bottom of a ship's hull
binnacle a box found on the deck of a ship near the helm which holds the compass
bitts strong posts fastened in pairs in the deck of a ship to which are attached cables and ropes
bluff-bowed a ship which has little inclination: the bows are nearly vertical
bobstay rope used to pull the bowsprit of a ship downwards
boom a long spar extending from a ship to increase or 'boom out' the foot of a sail, or a pole erected to mark the course of a channel or deep water
bowsprit a large pole extending from the stem of a vessel to which the foremast stays are fixed
bulkhead a partition in a ship which divides the hold or creates a cabin
bumpkin boom used to extend the foresail, mainsail, and mizzen
burgee a triangular or swallowtailed flag used as a distinguishing flag on yachts
carronade a piece of ordnance, mainly used on shipboard
catspaw a slight breeze which ripples the sea surface
clipper vessel built for fast sailing
culvert a channel or conduit carrying a stream across or beneath a canal
davit-tackles a pair of cranes on the side of a ship with sheaves and pulleys for raising or lowering a boat
ferry packet a boat travelling at regular intervals between two points
fo'c'sle forecastle, a short raised deck at the fore end of a vessel
foresail the principal sail set on the foremast (the forward lower mast)
forestay a strong rope stretching from the foremast-head towards the bowsprit end
galliot a small boat propelled by sails and oars and used for swift navigation
grapnel a tool with iron claws used especially for seizing and securing boats
gunwale the upper edge of a ship's side
halyards rope used for raising or lowering a sail, spar, or flag
hawse-pipe a cast-iron pipe fitted into the hawse-hole (one of two holes

-275-

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The Riddle of the Sands: A Record of Secret Service
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Oxford World's Classics ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • Note on the Text xix
  • Select Bibliography xx
  • A Chronology of Robert Erskine Childers xxi
  • Preface to the Present Edition 2
  • Preface to the Original Edition 3
  • Note 5
  • Chapter I the Letter 11
  • Chapter II the Dulcibella 17
  • Chapter III Davies 28
  • Chapter IV Retrospect 36
  • Chapter IV Retrospect 43
  • Chapter IV Retrospect 50
  • Chapter IV Retrospect 56
  • Chapter VIII the Theory 67
  • Chapter IX I Sign Articles 77
  • Chapter X His Chance 85
  • Chapter XI the Pathfinders 92
  • Chapter XII My Initiation 99
  • Chapter XII My Initiation 108
  • Chapter XIV the First Night in the Islands 113
  • Chapter XV Bensersiel 120
  • Chapter XVI Commander Von Brüning 126
  • Chapter XVI Commander Von Brüning 138
  • Chapter XVIII Imperial Escort 148
  • Chapter XIX the Rubicon 153
  • Chapter XX the Little Drab Book 164
  • Chapter XX the Little Drab Book 173
  • Chapter XXII the Quartette 186
  • Chapter XXIII a Change of Tactics 196
  • Chapter XXIII a Change of Tactics 207
  • Chapter XXIII a Change of Tactics 220
  • Chapter XVII the Seven Siels 230
  • Chapter XXVII the Luck of the Stowaway 240
  • Chapter XXVII the Luck of the Stowaway 252
  • Epilogue by the Editor 260
  • Explanatory Notes 269
  • Nautical Glossary 275
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