Spaniards and Indians in Southeastern Mesoamerica: Essays on the History of Ethnic Relations

By Murdo J. MacLeod; Robert Wasserstrom | Go to book overview

Lowland Maya Political Economy: Historical and Archaeological Perspectives in Light of Intensive Agriculture

David Freidel


Introduction

Archaeology ends and history begins on the Yucatan peninsula with the arrival of the Spanish. The Conquest stands as a boundary marker for the dominions of historiography and archaeological analysis of material remains. Like all boundaries, this one is subject to some questioning. Mayanist archaeologists and historians alike have generally championed the reality of a continuum bridging the pre-Columbian and Christian eras.1 Indeed, much archaelogical interpretation in the areas rests on the validity of "specific historical analogy".2 Yet students of these related disciplines have maintained, until quite recently, a respectful distance from an area in which they might have engaged in serious collaboration: the Contact, or epi-historical, period of the sixteenth century.3 A critical examination of archaeological data in light of coeval texts (and vice versa) is still in its infancy. Until historians and archaeologists meet at the boundary, judgments concerning the state of affairs at Contact and the dynamics of acculturation that ensued might best be regarded as hypotheses not yet corroborated by independent data.

The problem of mistaking hypotheses for conclusions in the Contact period has ramifications both forward and backward in time. If one looks backward, the major ramification is the application of imperfect analogy. As the examples outlined in this paper indicate, analogical models based on tests alone are inherently vulnerable. First, even in those cases in which early observations refer to specific incidents, practices, or material ambience, sifting the significant from the incidental facts must be guided by a self-limiting historiographic conception of general context in the absence of archaeological information. Second, the violent confrontation of alien worlds dictated an initial unconscious selection by observers for

-40-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Spaniards and Indians in Southeastern Mesoamerica: Essays on the History of Ethnic Relations
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 292

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.