Women's Sport and Spectacle: Gendered Television Coverage and the Olympic Games

By Gina Daddario | Go to book overview
Save to active project

2
The Transformation of Women's Olympic Sport into Olympic Spectacle

When you think of an Olympic sport or sports event, a female athlete is as likely to come to mind as a male athlete. In the sport of track-and-field, Jackie Joyner-Kersee is as likely to come to mind as Carl Lewis; in the sport of swimming, Janet Evans is as likely to come to mind as Mark Spitz. In the sports of figure skating and diving, Nancy Kerrigan likely comes to mind before Brian Boitano, and Mary Ellen Clark before Mark Lenzi.

Obviously, gender-balanced name recognition is a relatively new phenomenon and most likely limited to Olympic sport and professional tennis, two arenas that actively promote female athletes to the same degree, if not more so, than male athletes. Most sports enthusiasts would be hard-pressed to identify a female athlete as readily as a male athlete in most collegiate and professional sports.

While male athletes still dominate the Olympic Games in participation, female athletes often win more than their proportionate share of medals and receive more than their proportionate share of Olympic glory in the forms of press attention and public adulation. For example, female athletes from Eastern Europe traditionally win as many or more medals than their male team members, particularly in the Winter Games. Seldom has as much adulation and/or attention been bestowed on male athletes as it has on gymnasts Olga Korbut, Nadia Comaneci, and Mary Lou Retton; figure skaters Katarina Witt, Nancy Kerrigan, and Tonya Harding; and

-33-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Women's Sport and Spectacle: Gendered Television Coverage and the Olympic Games
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 174

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?