Women's Sport and Spectacle: Gendered Television Coverage and the Olympic Games

By Gina Daddario | Go to book overview

nals are held in the afternoon and the women's during prime time ( Vecsey, 1992). It is also evidenced in the barrage of skating entertainment programming that emerged in the 1996-1997 television season, including such prime-time specials as "Rock' n Roll Figure Skating." According to the debut issue of Sports Illustrated's WomenSport magazine ( 1997), figure skating is now the second most watched sport on television, behind pro-football.

Despite the scandalous and sensationalistic framing of the Harding /Kerrigan spectacle, a subversive reading also supports the view that women's figure skating is big sport and big business. Perhaps this spectacle can help facilitate coverage of, and interest in, less spectacular women's sport. The adoption of characteristics of both the melodramatic art and feminine narrative forms may help make this interest in women's sport possible.


NOTES
1.
Janice Kaplan of TV Guide magazine was interviewed by Leeza Gibbons for the made-for-television documentary, "Shattered Glory," which was produced by Inter/Sport, Inc., and aired February 20, 1994, on NBC.
2.
This made-for-television movie has been rebroadcast several times since Spring 1994. A visit to Lifetime Television's web site, www.lifetimetv.com, listed it as airing in February 1997-a ratings sweeps month.
3.
Michael Rosenberg, Tonya Harding's former agent, was also interviewed on NBC's "Shattered Glory" documentary.

-128-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Women's Sport and Spectacle: Gendered Television Coverage and the Olympic Games
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 174

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.