From Spear to Flintlock: A History of War in Europe and the Middle East to the French Revolution

By Frederic J. Baumgartner | Go to book overview

Preface

The study of the history of war and the military has undergone a profound change in the 1980s. It has become for the first time a legitimate area of professional expertise for academic historians. Prior to 1960, military history was regarded primarily as the domain of a small number of historians associated largely with military academies. Their purpose was to teach future officers the strategy and tactics of past wars and battles in order to prepare them for military careers. Outside of the military academies there was a small number of historians working in military history, who were regarded by their colleagues as antiquarians. Indeed they often were antiquarians, consumed with the desire to learn the smallest details of the tactics of battle, old weaponry, and so forth.

As a result of both the Vietnam War and a strong pacifist movement among intellectuals in America and western. Europe, military history fell into even greater disfavor on college campuses in the 1960s. The very popular new social history, in which the lowest, most powerless levels of society were regarded as the most worthy subjects of study, had no place for military history. However, the changing mood of Western society and the recognition that ignoring the military was producing a higlily inaccurate account of the past has led to vast growth of interest in the subject. One real benefit of the historical trends of the previous twenty years is that the techniques of the new social history are being applied to the study of war and the military. Armies are now being studied as social institutions; the question of what has made men fight is being studied through the principles of modern psychology; and investigations into the past economic impact of the military and war are being undertaken. Military history is moving for the first time into the mainstream of the historical profession.

Far more colleges and universities are now offering courses in military history, but the production of textbooks for these courses has lagged far behind. This work is intended to be a textbook for a college-level course on military history up to the French Revolution, or for the first part of a general survey of military histon. Most such courses are placed at the

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
From Spear to Flintlock: A History of War in Europe and the Middle East to the French Revolution
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 353

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.