CHAPTER VIII
OUT OF TWILIGHT

Woburn Buildings; Letters to Lady Gregory--Return of Yeats' Family to Dublin; A Quarrel with George Moore --Ideas of Good and Evil--New Love Poetry and Marriage of Maud Gonne--Theatre of Beauty--Miss Horniman's Offer: "I will give you a Theatre"--Letters from America--Yeats' Successes in the States; Yeats as

Orator

Hurry to bless the hands that play,
The mouths that speak, the notes and strings,
O masters of the glittering town!
O! lay the shrilly trumpet down,
Though drunken with the flags that sway
Over the ramparts and the towers,
And with the waving of your wings.


I

Even in the years of the foundation of the Irish Theatre, when business took him so often to Ireland, Yeats spent at least half his time in London. Though he considered the summer at Coole as the most productive period of his year, at least in poetry, his life at Woburn Buildings was laborious and ordered. Unless he was working at the British Museum, he would be indoors writing until four, when he dressed, and either received visitors or went out to seek literary friends or his "mystics". When he had no evening engagements he would take long solitary walks,

-186-

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W. B. Yeats, 1865-1939
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