NOTES

I. POEMS ON ANCESTORS (page 2)

I find that the lines in the original edition of Responsibilities
. . . You that did not weigh the cost
Old Butlers when you took to horse and stood
Beside the brackish waters of the Boyne
Till your bad master blenched and all was lost

were subsequently altered to

A Butler or an Armstrong that withstood
Beside the brackish waters of the Boyne
James and the Irish when the Dutchman crossed.

It had been brought to Yeats' notice that his Butler ancestor had fought on William's side, not on that of James, at the Battle of the Boyne. Elsewhere, except where stated, I have quoted Yeats' final versions.


II. THE ORDER OF THE GOLDEN DAWN AND THE SOURCE OF ITS TEACHINGS (pages 75, passim)

A typescript among Yeats' papers dated 1923 records that the cypher MSS. on which the old G. D. and its successor S. M were founded were discovered by a clergyman, the Rev. A. F. A. W., on an old bookstall in London in 1884. Attached to the cypher was a letter saying that if anyone could decipher the MSS. and would communicate with Sapiens Dominabitur Astris, c/o Fräulein Anna Sprengel in Hanover, they would receive interesting information.

Dr. Wynn Westcott, the London coroner, declared that at the start of the Order he received letters from Anna Sprengel, who was a member of a German Rosicrucian Order. But it was never known for what purpose the cypher MSS. was drawn up and left on the London bookstall. Dr. Westcott had cyphers of the Outer Rituals, but the greater part of the original Order lectures were based upon Mrs. Mathers' clairvoyance. Later, when difficulties arose with Mathers, Dr. Westcott received a postcard from the German Order which said: "Have no fears, Mathers cannot harm you". In Dr. Westcott's opinion Mathers was an adventurer from the first, and in

-515-

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W. B. Yeats, 1865-1939
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Prefatory Note v
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Chapter I - Family and Early Associations 1
  • Chapter II - Schooldays 24
  • Chapter III - London (1887-91) 59
  • Chapter IV - Death of Parnel After An After 85
  • Chapter V - Mysticism in Prose and Verse 109
  • Chapter VII - Theatre and Politics: Maud Gonne 152
  • Chapter VIII - Out of Twilight 186
  • Chapter IX - The Abbey Theatre 215
  • Chapter X - Plays and Controversies 229
  • Chapter XI - Variety (1910-12) 259
  • Chapter XII - Responsibilities 280
  • Chapter XIII - Nineteen-Sixteen 295
  • Chapter XIV - Marriage 327
  • Chapter XV - Oxford 346
  • Chapter XVI - Meditations in Time of Civil War 366
  • Chapter XVII - A Sixty-Year-Old Smiling Public Man 391
  • Chapter XVIII - Wheels and Butterflies 427
  • Chapter XIX - Riversdale 462
  • Chapter XX - Old Age 475
  • Notes 515
  • Bibliography 519
  • Index 521
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