La Venta, Tabasco: a Study of Olmec Ceramics and Art

By Philip Drucker | Go to book overview

FOREWORD

This report on two brief seasons of excavations at La Venta seems to have been doomed from the outset to the hopper of the sort of mill that, whether or not it grinds fine, certainly grinds exceeding slow. This was unfortunate, for when the field work was being done, there was considerable interest in the Olmec problem, and a more timely appearance of the report would have been desirable. However, the attack on Pearl Harbor, which interrupted many crucial things, reduced the first season's program drastically, and then separated me from field notes and sherd and jade collections for some 3 years. After the war, in between other tasks, I was able to work on the report. Finally it was nearly done, and I found myself about to go back on active duty. Just 3 years ago, I hastily checked through the rough manuscript, with a thick sheaf of notes and sketches about the illustrations and figures, and dumped the whole hodgepodge into the hands of the Bureau of American Ethnology's editor, Miss M. Helen Palmer. While I luxuriated on Micronesia's coral strands and blue lagoons, Miss Palmer pulled the report together. I am offering her my thanks here. The readers of this report should thank her, too, for giving it such readability as it may have, and for editing out my grammatical lapses. The reader and I owe her thanks also for seeing the art work through, a particularly rugged chore when the author is as out of reach as I was.

Drs. Shepard and Wedel have made signal contributions to the present report, and I am indebted to them. It will be the reader's responsibility, however, to integrate the results of their sections with those I wrote, for I have seen their final versions only in the galley proofs, which made it too late for me to make any major revisions. The report will be improved if the conclusions of Miss Shepard's "Appendix" and Wedel's chapter are tied in with the rest, but the reader will have to undertake that task, blaming me and not my colleagues for the added burden.

It is also a matter of some embarrassment that I have not been able to take into account the various major contributions to our knowledge of Mesoamerican prehistory that have appeared in the 3 years since I submitted the manuscript. The results of such studies as Smith's Uaxactun report, Miss Proskouriakoffs analysis of Mayan sculpture, and Garcia Payón's researches in the archeology of central Veracruz,

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
La Venta, Tabasco: a Study of Olmec Ceramics and Art
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 260

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.