The Strategy of World Order - Vol. 1

By Richard A. Falk; Saul H. Mendlovitz | Go to book overview

2 The Causes of War and of Peace

This chapter is an introduction to the study of war. It surveys the main lines of explanation that have been given to account for past wars. No more than a minimum intellectual context can be given. The literature on war is vast. The subject of war has fascinated and perplexed man for centuries. Many heroic attempts have been made to give the explanation of why warfare is so prevalent in human history. None has proved to be entirely satisfactory. No single explanation of war has been accepted by a concensus of either scholars or statesmen. What exists is a bewildering variety of partial explanations, the better of of which shed light on some aspects of the causative processes that eventuate in war See Luther L. Bernard, War and Its Causes (Holt, New York, 1944); Morris Ginsburg. "The Causes of War," Sociological Review, vol. 31 ( 1939) p. 121.

We begin with a chapter from Quincy Wright's impressive work entitled A Study of War (unabridged ed., University of Chicago Press, 1965). This is probably the most authoritative, and certainly the most comprehensive, recent account of war. It is a great synthesis of all the thinking and experience on the subject. The short selection included here enumerates causal explanations for six great periods of warfare in human history. Wright also adds a helpful discussion of what it means to talk of the "cause" of war. Nothing is resolved by Wright's chapter, but the range of explanations that have been put forward to account for some of the great wars of the past are reviewed. Do these explanations "fit" the conditions of conflict today, so that if war breaks out it will be possible to choose from the stockpile of explanation assembled by Wright? Note that contemporary writing on the risk of nuclear war emphasizes accident, miscalculation, escalation, and catalytic agency. See Kahn, Chapter I. Does this suggest a shift in the causal basis of war in the nuclear age reflecting the awareness that major war is no longer likely to be a product of rational choice? Does this emphasis suggest a loss of human freedom and an acceptance of what night be called "technological determinism"?

-123-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Strategy of World Order - Vol. 1
Table of contents
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 394

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.