Acequia Culture: Water, Land, and Community in the Southwest

By José A. Rivera | Go to book overview

Preface

Water-resources planning is attracting unparalleled attention around the globe from local, national, and international bodies aware that a sustainable supply of water is crucial to meet growing demands today as well as the projected needs of future generations. Concern over water-management policies and practices is especially critical in arid and semiarid territories, which comprise approximately one-third of the earth's land surface. In the western United States, municipal, industrial, commercial agricultural, and other users increasingly look to new technologies and improved management practices as the means to recycle wastewater or to reduce consumption altogether.

At the same time, the era of large-scale water development, meant to harvest and channel water destined for urbanizing regions or to reclaim desert lands for agricultural production, is rapidly ending. In its place, a new conservation ethic is taking root across the spectrum of users and advocates, from computer-chip manufacturers to mayors of sunbelt cities. Conservation programs extol new water-conserving techniques and urge facilities managers, contractors, farmers, residential consumers, agency employees, and schoolchildren to modify wasteful behaviors. There is growing appreciation that while water is crucial to the survival of communities, it is also renewable, if managed conservatively.

In the long run, however, sustainability of water quantity and quality may depend more on democratic and social processes than on technological or regulatory fixes, particularly when incorporating regions of the world with diverse cultures and equally different, often conflictive, views of water. Past efforts by public officials to impose mandatory conservation

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Acequia Culture: Water, Land, and Community in the Southwest
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Documents vi
  • Illustrations ix
  • Preface xi
  • Introduction xvii
  • Chapter One - Irrigation Communities on the Río Grande 1
  • Two Evolution of the Acequia Institution 25
  • Three Acequia Governance and Administration 49
  • Four Water Democracies: the Acequia Papers 77
  • Five Contemporary Status of Acequias: Development Vs. Sustainability 147
  • Six the Future of the Acequia Institution: State Policies and Acequia Action Strategies 187
  • Notes 205
  • Acequia Glossary 227
  • Selected Readings 233
  • Index 237
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 244

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.