Florida Indians and the Invasion from Europe

By Jerald T. Milanich | Go to book overview

8

Colonization and First Settlement

Spain was not alone in wanting to establish a colony in La Florida. One of her rivals, France, also had designs on the Americas, La Florida included. In 1524 the Florentine explorer Giovanni da Verrazano, sailing under the flag of France, had reconnoitered the Atlantic coast from Florida to Cape Breton, providing some basis for French claims of ownership. The expeditions of Luna and Villafañe were in part responses to actual and rumored French excursions. France and Spain both realized that to control La Florida, settlements were needed.

In late 1561 rumors of a French expedition to La Florida reached the Spanish Crown. Jean Ribault was said to have sailed for the Americas to establish a colony.1 Although his actual sailing date was not until early 1562, news of Ribault's expedition and stories of other planned French initiatives prompted the Spanish Crown to approve a new attempt to place a colony in La Florida even as Luna and Villafañe met with failure. Lucas Vázquez de Ayllón, son of the leader of the unsuccessful San Miguel de Gualdape colony, was contracted to found a settlement in the Bahia de Santa Maria, the Spanish name for Chesapeake Bay.

Ayllón had considerable trouble organizing his expedition, and did not sail from Spain until October 1563. But he got no further than Santo Domingo on Hispaniola. Disgruntled participants and financial

-143-

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Florida Indians and the Invasion from Europe
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • ILLUSTRATIONS ix
  • Preface xiii
  • 1 - Searching for the Past 1
  • 2 - An Old World and Its People 15
  • PART I - Indigenous People 33
  • 4 - Native People in Central Florida 63
  • 5 - Native People in Northern Florida 79
  • PART II - The Invasion 99
  • 7 - A Tide Unchecked 127
  • 8 - Colonization and First Settlement 143
  • PART III - The Aftermath 165
  • 10 - New Lives for Old: Life in the Mission Provinces 185
  • 11 - The End of Time 213
  • Epilogue 233
  • Notes 237
  • References 255
  • Index 279
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