The Early Church: From Ignatius to Augustine

By George Hodges | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VIII

CHRYSOSTOM

THE ministry of John, who for his eloquence was called Chrysostom, the Golden Mouth, falls into four divisions. It begins with his austerities as a monk in the mountains of Syria, and ends with his banishment and death among the mountains of Armenia; between this prologue and this epilogue are the twelve years of his activity as a preacher in Antioch and the six years of his activity as a bishop in Constantinople.


I

The city of Antioch lay between a pagan river and a Christian mountain.

The river was made pagan by the Grove of Daphne, a pleasure-garden on its banks. The garden was ten miles in circumference, planted with laurel and myrtle, with cypress trees and scented shrubs, and watered by running streams. In the midst stood a noble temple dedicated to Apollo, and commemorating the legend that in this place Daphne, pursued by the wanton god, had been transformed into a laurel tree. The

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The Early Church: From Ignatius to Augustine
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents ix
  • Chapter I - The Roman World 1
  • Chapter II - The Struggle for Life 30
  • Chapter III - The Defence of the Faith 63
  • Chapter IV - The Organization of Religion 94
  • Chapter V - The Arian Debate 121
  • Chapter VI - Monasticism in the East 150
  • Chapter VII - Ambrose 180
  • Chapter VIII - Chrysostom 208
  • Chapter IX - Monasticism in the West 241
  • Chapter X - Augustine 272
  • Appendix - Tables of Dates 301
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