Wyoming, a Guide to Its History, Highways, and People

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ranch, come into view. South of Wells, as the snow drifts deeply here in winter, tall willows are set in the shoulders of the highway to indicate the route. At 166.7 m. a sign points to drinking water. Barren hills and alkali flats, greasewood and salt sage characterize the country ahead. In the springtime, the small ridge of hills (R) shows splashes of green within the cup-shaped depressions near the crests.

At 169.4 m. is the junction with an improved road.

Left on this road is WINTON, 4 m. (6,945 alt., 303 pop.), a coal-mining community.

North of Rock Springs, the valley stretches eastward to ocher-tinted mountainsides, with an occasional blue summit beyond. To the R. are washed clay and shale banks, white below but streaked with gray above. The highway crosses KILLPECKER CREEK, 178.9 m.

At 179 m. is the junction with a dirt road.

Right on this road to the foot of the chalk bluffs, 0.2 m., west of Killpecker Creek. Here is the SITE OF BLAIR'S STOCKADE and the old ROCK SPRING for which the town is named (see Tour 2C). Archie and Duncan Blair built a trading post here, in 1866, and furnished hungry travelers with venison steak and coffee. Becky Thomas, the station master, charged 10¢ a head for watering thirsty horses. The post was sold in the 1870's for $14, and only a few crumbling stones remain on the site. Back of it rise great rocks on which emigrants carved their names.

About 200 yards south is the site of No. 6 POWDER HOUSE, where, on July 17, 1891, two men on a drunken lark fired into 1,200 kegs of blasting powder and 700 pounds of dynamite. The building disappeared, leaving a great ragged hole. Four men were killed.

Miners' houses, set against the cliffs along the highway, are built of local stone chinked with mortar from Killpecker Creek.

ROCK SPRINGS, 179.7 m. (6,271 air., 8,440 pop.) (see Tour 2C), is at the junction with US 30 (see Tour 2).


Tour 7A

Junction with US 187--Grand Teton National Park Headquarters; 11.6 m., Park Drive and US 187.

Oiled roadbed.

Dude ranches, cabins, camp and picnic grounds.

-350-

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