Statistical Handbook on Consumption and Wealth in the United States

By Chandrika Kaul; Valerie Tomaselli-Moschovitis | Go to book overview

C. Business and Corporate Wealth

GENERAL OVERVIEW

Section C examines wealth in the business and corporate environment. The indicators presented--such as gross product, assets and liabilities, and income and expenses--examine the sources of corporate and business wealth, along with its disposition and uses. The data will help users to see how businesses create wealth and use it to their advantage--for growth, for further investment, and to generate income and wealth for individual investors. (Information on consumption of business services can be found in Section F.)


EXPLANATION OF INDICATORS

C1. Number of Business Tax Returns, Business Receipts, and Corporate Balance Sheet: These first three charts offer basic background information on the business scene in the United States. Including the number of tax returns filed, receipts reported, and summarized balance sheet information, the data provide information on scope of business activity, breadth of income generated, and the wealth generated by business activity.

C2. Corporations--Selected Financial Items, by Industry: The next two tables offer information on business activity broken down by type of industry. This helps the user to investigate the income and wealth-generating capacity of the various sectors in the U.S. economy.

C3. Corporations--Annual Percent Change in Receipts, by Industry: This next table charts the annual change (growth, in most cases) in corporate income across various sectors. Starting in 1980, it presents a mid- range timeframe, rooting the more current data in prior performance.

C4. Corporations--Selected Financial Items, by Asset-Size Class and Industry: This table shows the number of enterprises (by tax returns) and amount of assets, receipts, deductions, and net income by industry and by asset class size. Also, broken down by industry, it helps the user to investigate the income and wealth- generating performance of companies of various sizes and in various sectors.

C5. Corporations--Receipts, Percent Distribution by Asset-Size Class and Industry: This table and chart show the percentage of total corporate receipts reported by corporations of various sizes, classified by amount of assets and industry. It offers a sectoral breakdown and presents a snapshot from the mid-decade, 1995. The chart offers a visual representation of the data, helping the user to visualize the performance of various sectors and size-classes of companies.

C6. Corporate Profits, by Industry: The next chart and two tables present information on corporate profits. The first analyzes corporate profits across a short-term timeframe ( 1990-1996), breaking corporate profits up into such items as pre-tax profits, taxes paid, and dividends. The next chart summarizes and compares pre-tax profits and profits after tax, helping the user to understand the share of wealth generated by corporations but consumed by public needs and interests. The following table shows the distribution of total pre-tax and after-tax corporate profits across the various industries in the U.S. economy.

C7. US. Largest Public Companies: The next three tables show the activity of the largest publicly held corporations, by industry, in terms of profitability, growth in sales, growth in earnings, and debt to capital ratio. These indicators represent hallmarks of corporate success. The data allow users to compare the performance of various industries in terms of their capacity to generate wealth.

C8. 1000 Largest Industrial Corporations: The next two tables present profits, earnings, and return information, for the 1000 largest companies in the U.S., broken down by industry. As with the previous set of tables, these allow a comparison of various industries in the economy and their capacity to generate income and wealth, not just for corporate reinvestment but for individual investment purposes as well.

C9. U.S. Multinational Companies: The next four tables present various data on the productive and income-

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