Statistical Handbook on Consumption and Wealth in the United States

By Chandrika Kaul; Valerie Tomaselli-Moschovitis | Go to book overview

E. Consumption--Material Goods

GENERAL OVERVIEW

The data in Section E begin to describe consumption habits in the United States in detail. Whereas the previous section presented basic overview information on consumption in the United States, the tables and charts here cover one aspect of consumption--material goods-- in great depth. The next two sections--F and G--cover other specific areas of consumption in great detail as well: Services (Section F), and Travel, Leisure, and Other Non-Essentials (Section G).

Data on several basic categories of material goods are presented here, such as food, housing, clothing, and appliances. The examination of these categories reaches deeply into highly specific subcategories; for example, the food category covers not just meat but the kind and cut of meat as well. The data also present information on several variables including year-by-year and state- by-state analyses. The section also examines, in some instances where applicable and appropriate, not just total consumption, but prices as well.


EXPLANATION OF INDICATORS

E1. Per Capita Consumption of Major Food Commodities: The first set of tables and charts presents data on a vast variety of foods consumed on a per capita basis over the course of a 16-year period ( 1980 to 1996). The eight charts at the beginning show the per capita consumption of major food groups, without specific totals of the subcategories within each food group, to help the user develop a broad-stroke view of the current trends in food consumption. The following six tables present detailed information on each of those subcategories spread across the 16-year period.

E2. Food--Retail Prices of Selected Items : The next two tables present detailed information on the price of specific food products. Broken down into five general categories--cereals and bakery products, meats, dairy products, fresh fruit and vegetables, and processed fruits and vegetables--the data on prices are extended over a time period from 1990 to 1997. This helps the viewer put a dollar figure on the consumption levels presented in the above set of tables and charts.

E3. Per Capita Consumption of Selected Beverages, by Tape: The next two tables present data on beverages consumed on a per capita basis over the course of a 16-year period ( 1980 to 1996). The data are broken down into detailed subcategories within two general beverage types: alcoholic and non-alcoholic.

E4. Macronutrients, Quantities Available for Consumption per Capita per Day: The next six tables present data on trends, over a 24-year time frame ( 1970 to 1994), concerning all types of nutrients consumed by the U.S. public. In terms of per capita/per day intake, they give the user an understanding of the amount of nutritional value available to the U.S. consumer.

E5. Value of New Construction Put in Place : The next group (two sets of one chart and two tables) presents data on new construction values within the current decade ( 1990 to 1997). The first set (a chart and two tables) presents construction values put in place in current dollars. The lead chart presents total figures and the two tables present data on construction values broken down by private, then public, construction. The remaining set (a chart and two tables) presents the same data in constant dollars, with the effects of inflation muted, based on 1992 dollar valuations.

E6. New Privately Owned Housing Units Started, Total and by State: The next chart and table present data on the building of new private housing on a state- by-state basis. They cover the last half of the current decade, exposing the most recent trends in new residential construction. The last column in each table separates out single-family units from all of the other residences.

E7. Homeownership Rates, Total and by State : The next chart and table outline rates of individual home ownership throughout the period from 1985 to 1997. The

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Statistical Handbook on Consumption and Wealth in the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents iii
  • Introduction v
  • List of Tables and Charts vii
  • A. General Economic Data 1
  • B. Personal, Family, and Household Income and Wealth 22
  • C. Business and Corporate Wealth 77
  • D. Overview of Consumption 97
  • E. Consumption--Material Goods 121
  • F. Consumption-----Services 177
  • G. Consumption--Travel, Leisure, and Other Non-Essentials 215
  • H. the Role of Government 254
  • Appendix: International Perspective 273
  • Index 281
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