Corporate Lawbreaking and Interactive Compliance: Resolving the Regulation-Deregulation Dichotomy

By Jay A. Sigler; Joseph E. Murphy | Go to book overview
Save to active project

6
Demonstrating Ethical Responsibility: Implementing a Self-Governance Program

Paul M. Carren and Richard B. Pazornik

A long habit of not thinking a thing wrong gives it the superficial appearance of being right.

Thomas Paine

Over the past decade, media and regulatory attention has focused time and time again on what has been perceived as corporate irresponsibility. No industry has escaped criticism of its ethical probity. Areas of business activity as diverse as the environment ( Exxon Valdez), securities ( Drexel Burnham Lambert), government procurement (Operation "Ill Wind"), and banking ( Lincoln Savings) provide a few examples where corporate America has seemingly failed to uphold its responsibility to society at large, its customers, and its employees.

This chapter is intended to assist companies that either are developing a self-governance program or are already operating under some form of self-governance program and wish to reevaluate or update the program in light of the current environment. After reading this chapter, one will be able to identify the key elements of a successful self-governance program and to set a company agenda for implementing such a program.

In the past it was taken for granted that companies, like individuals, should act within the bounds of the law. The U.S. business community

-71-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Corporate Lawbreaking and Interactive Compliance: Resolving the Regulation-Deregulation Dichotomy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 208

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?