Behind Closed Doors: Gender, Sexuality, and Touch in the Doctor/Patient Relationship

By Angelica Redleaf; Susan A. Baird | Go to book overview

4
Explorations and Applications
Gender, sexuality and touch in the doctor/patient relationship are issues that have always affected both doctor and patient, yet until recently, they have been little touched-upon in the education of physicians. All health-care practitioners need training in these areas, training that involves looking at their attitudes and behaviors regarding gender, sexuality, and touch. Until these subjects become a part of doctor education, doctors will be more likely to care for their patients in ways that are inappropriate and even harmful, in ways that are at odds with the very purpose of health care.
PERSONAL EXPLORATIONS IN GENDER, SEXUALITY, AND TOUCH
It is important to acknowledge that we all have limiting ideas and biases that affect our perceptions. Figuring out what these ideas and biases are, and maintaining an awareness of what affects they might have, is the key to dealing with them rationally and appropriately. For instance, if you feel uncomfortable in the presence of a certain patient, it is helpful to understand why.
Gender
1. What is your gender identity? Is it predominately what our society currently categorizes as masculine or feminine? How do you feel about that?
2. What range of gender roles are you comfortable with in others?
Do you feel comfortable around a very businesslike woman?
Do you feel comfortable around a very nurturing man?
3. Do you appreciate someone who can comfortably shift from one gender role to another--in other words, with someone who has a wide personality range?
4. How satisfying do you find your relationship with your female patients? With your male patients?
5. What percentage of your female patients do you believe are satisfied with you

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Behind Closed Doors: Gender, Sexuality, and Touch in the Doctor/Patient Relationship
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface ix
  • PART I Gender, Sexuality, and Touch 1
  • 1: Gender 3
  • Notes 29
  • 2: Sexuality 33
  • 3: Touch 43
  • 4: Explorations and Applications 53
  • PART II Sexual Misconduct 61
  • 5: What Is Misconduct? 63
  • 6: HOW Misconduct Occurs 71
  • 7: Caring for the Abused Patient 87
  • 8: Boundaries and Consent 91
  • 9: The Doctor Role 97
  • 10: What Is the Solution? 105
  • PART III Patient Protection Protocol 109
  • 12: Safe Practice Strategies 115
  • 13: Safe Practice Analysis 127
  • 14: Making Changes 161
  • 15: Defusing Sexual Attractions 169
  • PART IV Review 175
  • --16-- Six Factors for Safe Practice 177
  • 17: The New Patnership 183
  • Bibliography 185
  • Recommended Reading 191
  • Recommended Viewing 195
  • Index 199
  • About the Authors 213
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