Behind Closed Doors: Gender, Sexuality, and Touch in the Doctor/Patient Relationship

By Angelica Redleaf; Susan A. Baird | Go to book overview

Recommended Viewing

Article 99 ( U.S.: Orion, 1991), with Ray Liotta and Kiefer Sutherland. Howard Deutch's lighthearted drama about doctors at a V.A. hospital, who battle the bureaucracy on behalf of their patients.

Awakenings ( U.S.: RCA/Columbia, 1990), with Robert DeNiro and Robin Williams. Penny Marshall's drama about a comatose patient and the doctor who refuses to give up on him--and, eventually, helps the patient to regain consciousness after 30 years in a coma. Based on Dr. Oliver Sacks's book and real-life experiences.

Boxing Helena ( U.S.: Mainline Pictures, 1993), with Julian Sands and Sherilyn Penn. Harrowing drama about a doctor's fantasy of taking possession--surgically--of the woman he loves, so that she can't leave him.

City of Joy ( England/France: 1992), with Patrick Swayze and Pauline Collins. Roland Jaffe's drama about a doctor's quest for self-knowledge in the slums of Calcutta, in which he finds joy and satisfaction by learning to practice--and to live--for the sake of his patients rather than for himself. (Selflessness this extreme is required of saints, not doctors, but this film still does a good job of illustrating the difference between serving one's own needs and serving the needs of the patient.) The screenplay, by Mark Medoff, is based on Dominique Lapier's book.

Compromising Positions ( U.S.: 1985), with Susan Sarandon, Raul Julia, and Joe Mantegna. Frank Perry's mystery/black comedy about a periodontist who engages in abusive, sexually inappropriate behavior with many of his female patients, and about the search for his murderer. Based on the novel by Susan Isaacs, who also wrote the screenplay.

Dad ( U.S.: 1989), with Ted Danson, Jack Lemmon, and Olympia Dukakis. Gary David Goldberg's drama about a father's fatal illness and about the attempts of him and his adult son to come to terms with each other and the health-care system.

Dead Ringers ( Canada: 1988), with Jeremy Irons and Genevieve Bujold. David Cronenberg's drama about twin gynecologists in joint practice, who share their patients and their lovers; and about the choice one of them is forced to make, when

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Behind Closed Doors: Gender, Sexuality, and Touch in the Doctor/Patient Relationship
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface ix
  • PART I Gender, Sexuality, and Touch 1
  • 1: Gender 3
  • Notes 29
  • 2: Sexuality 33
  • 3: Touch 43
  • 4: Explorations and Applications 53
  • PART II Sexual Misconduct 61
  • 5: What Is Misconduct? 63
  • 6: HOW Misconduct Occurs 71
  • 7: Caring for the Abused Patient 87
  • 8: Boundaries and Consent 91
  • 9: The Doctor Role 97
  • 10: What Is the Solution? 105
  • PART III Patient Protection Protocol 109
  • 12: Safe Practice Strategies 115
  • 13: Safe Practice Analysis 127
  • 14: Making Changes 161
  • 15: Defusing Sexual Attractions 169
  • PART IV Review 175
  • --16-- Six Factors for Safe Practice 177
  • 17: The New Patnership 183
  • Bibliography 185
  • Recommended Reading 191
  • Recommended Viewing 195
  • Index 199
  • About the Authors 213
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