Islam and Modernization: A Comparative Analysis of Pakistan, Egypt, and Turkey

By Javaid Saeed | Go to book overview

8
CONCLUSION

The main finding that emerges from this study is that the existing ideas and conceptions of life which are presented, propagated, and inculcated as Islamic religious thought, practices, way of life, orientations, and traditions are a major obstacle to the development of Pakistan, Egypt, and Turkey. The same is true for all other Muslim countries, for the situation is the same throughout the Muslim world. In some cases, it is worse because of other operating factors. Another part of this finding is that Muslim societies can develop and progress only through Islam. Islamic religious thought, as contained in the Qur'an, is an exceedingly powerful productive force which Muslim societies have not yet realized and utilized.

Islam fully sanctions, and indeed requires, that people acquire material prosperity. To be successful in this world is vitally important for the Qur'an, a point Muslim societies have not really grasped; and one measure of this success is certainly prosperity. For Islamic societies to become progressive, it is of crucial importance that changes in Muslims' ideas about Islam occur. These changes cannot be brought about through fiat, as Turkey's example illustrates. They can occur only through changes in the realm of thought, which alone can redeem Islam from the highly distorted ideas that, through the centuries, have wrongly been attributed to it. It is the distorted Islam which Muslims have adhered to in the last several centuries which has resulted in the present conditions of Muslim societies. Given the way Islam is understood by the mass of Muslim populations, including the elites (barring some outstanding exceptions, of course), it is a serious mistake to think that Muslim societies are developing; a recognition of this fact needs to be made by the societies concerned before they can begin to develop. A few changes here and there--in literacy or in the gross national product, or in the installation of some industrial units--do not amount to much, for the underlying structures and worldviews of the societies basically remain unchanged.

-197-

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Islam and Modernization: A Comparative Analysis of Pakistan, Egypt, and Turkey
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Tables vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - Explaining Modernization 9
  • 3 - Religion and Modernization 25
  • Conclusion 43
  • 4 - Islam and Modernization 45
  • Conclusion 69
  • 5 - The Religiopolitical System of Pakistan and Modernizatton 73
  • Conclusion 112
  • 6 - The Religiopolitical System of Egypt and Modernization 117
  • Conclusion 154
  • 7 - The Religiopolitical System of Turkey and Modernization 157
  • Conclusion 196
  • 8 - Conclusion 197
  • Notes 209
  • Bibliography 247
  • Index 257
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