American Theatre Companies, 1888-1930

By Weldon B. Durham | Go to book overview

Spruill, Katherine Squire, Karl Swenson, Blanche Tancock ( 1925-27), Frances Titsworth, Ada Warden, Arthur Weinstein, Marian F. Wetzel, Shirley White, Frances Williams ( 1927-30), Frances Wilson ( 1925-30), Russell Wright.


REPERTORY

(Note: Plays successful in one season were generally carried over to the next.)

1925-26: The Sea-Woman's Cloak, Twelfth Night, The Scarlet Letter.

1926-27: The Straw Hat, The Trumpet Shall Sound, Granite, Big Lake.

1927-28: Much Ado About Nothing, At the Gate of the Kingdom, The Bridal Veil, Doctor Knock, Martine.

1928-29: No public season this year; limited audiences invited for "Sunday-evening entertainments": Sicilian Limes, The Jealous Old Man, Coriolanus (scenes), The Countess Cathleen, Where It Is Thin There It Breaks.

1929-30: The Pretended Basque, The Jealous Old Man, The Three Sisters, A Glass of Water, Antigone, Le Boeuf Sur Le Toit.


BIBLIOGRAPHY

Published Source:

Roberts J. W. Richard Boleslavsky: His Life and Work in the Theatre. Ann Arbor, Mich.: UMI Research Press, 1981.

Unpublished Source:

Willis Ronald A. "The American Laboratory Theatre: 1923-1930." Ph. D. dissertation, University of Iowa, 1968.

Archival Resources:

Lawrence, Kansas. American Laboratory Theatre files are in the possession of Dr. Ronald A. Willis, University of Kansas, Lawrence.

New York, New York. New York Public Library has a collection of programs, brochures, catalogues, scrapbooks, and press clippings.

Jerry W. Roberts

AMERICAN PLAYERS. The American Players ( Spokane, Washington) was organized in the summer of 1916 by actor-manager Harry J. Leland. He leased the American Theatre (built in 1910 at the corner of Post Street and Front Avenue), which was then completely renovated with new paint, carpets, and decorations. The company opened with a production of George M. Cohan The Miracle Man, a light comedy, on September 3, 1916.

Though the company used many of the same personnel as the [Ernest] Wilkes Stock Company*, which had leased the American Theatre the previous season and had been scheduled to return to Spokane, the American Players were unconnected with the Wilkes' interests. When the Wilkes company did not renew its lease, Harry J. Leland, who had been stage director for the Wilkes group during its relatively successful Spokane season, apparently decided to start his own company in order to take advantage of what the Spokesman-Review called "Spokane's appreciation of home industry" and the local appetite for live drama which had never completely died out in Spokane.

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American Theatre Companies, 1888-1930
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • A 1
  • Bibliography 4
  • Bibliography 8
  • Bibliography 13
  • Bibliography 22
  • Bibliography 24
  • Bibliography 27
  • Bibliography 31
  • Bibliography 36
  • Bibliography 38
  • Bibliography 40
  • B 41
  • Bibliography 51
  • Bibliography 55
  • Bibliography 61
  • Bibliography 63
  • Bibliography 68
  • Bibliography 72
  • C 73
  • Bibliography 80
  • Bibliography 86
  • Bibliography 90
  • Bibliography 94
  • Bibliography 97
  • D 99
  • Bibliography 103
  • Bibliography 111
  • Bibliography 118
  • Bibliography 126
  • Bibliography 134
  • Bibliography 140
  • Bibliography 145
  • Bibliography 150
  • Bibliography 152
  • Bibliography 158
  • E 159
  • F 165
  • Bibliography 168
  • Bibliography 171
  • Bibliography 177
  • G 179
  • Bibliography 181
  • Bibliography 183
  • Bibliography 188
  • Bibliography 190
  • Bibliography 194
  • Bibliography 197
  • Bibliography 203
  • H 205
  • Bibliography 208
  • Bibliography 210
  • Bibliography 212
  • Bibliography 220
  • Bibliography 225
  • Bibliography 227
  • Bibliography 231
  • I 233
  • PERSONNEL 237
  • J 239
  • Bibliography 241
  • Bibliography 243
  • K 245
  • Bibliography 247
  • L 249
  • Bibliography 253
  • Bibliography 260
  • Bibliography 262
  • Bibliography 268
  • Bibliography 276
  • M 277
  • Bibliography 280
  • Bibliography 283
  • Bibliography 284
  • Bibliography 289
  • Bibliography 293
  • Bibliography 297
  • Bibliography 300
  • Bibliography 306
  • Bibliography 309
  • N 311
  • Bibliography 317
  • Bibliography 322
  • Bibliography 325
  • Bibliography 329
  • Bibliography 332
  • Bibliography 338
  • O 341
  • Bibliography 346
  • Bibliography 348
  • P 349
  • Bibliography 353
  • Bibliography 358
  • Bibliography 363
  • Bibliography 367
  • Bibliography 370
  • Bibliography 377
  • Bibliography 388
  • Q 391
  • R 393
  • Bibliography 396
  • Bibliography 399
  • Bibliography 402
  • Bibliography 404
  • S 405
  • Bibliography 407
  • Bibliography 411
  • Bibliography 413
  • Bibliography 416
  • Bibliography 424
  • Bibliography 428
  • Bibliography 432
  • T 433
  • Bibliography 442
  • U 443
  • Bibliography 447
  • V 449
  • Bibliography 453
  • W 455
  • Bibliography 460
  • Bibliography 463
  • Bibliography 470
  • Bibliography 472
  • Bibliography 478
  • Bibliography 482
  • Bibliography 485
  • Bibliography 488
  • Y 489
  • Bibliography 492
  • APPENDIX I CHRONOLOGY OF THEATRE COMPANIES 493
  • APPENDIX II THEATRE COMPANIES BY STATE 497
  • Index of Personal Names and Play Titles 501
  • About the Contributors 535
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