American Theatre Companies, 1888-1930

By Weldon B. Durham | Go to book overview

Gold Diggers, The Old Homestead, The Four Flusher, The French Doll, Little Old New York, Nothing but the Truth, Irene, The Copperhead, Little Miss Bluebeard, A Pair of Sixes, The Loves of Su Shong, The Misleading Lady, Silence, A Full House, The Goose Hangs High, Oh! Boy, The Great Divide, The Family Upstairs, Spooks, Experience, Our Little Wife, Lawful Larceny, Parlor, Bedroom and Bath, Mary, Applesauce, Mrs. Murphy's Second Husband, In Love with Love.


BIBLIOGRAPHY

Published Sources:

Billboard, 1924-26.

Schenectady Gazette, 1924-26.

Hart Larry. Schenectady's Golden Era, 1880- 1930. Scotia, New York: Old Dorp Books, 1974.

Mari Kathleen Fielder

BONSTELLE PLAYHOUSE COMPANY. See DETROIT CIVIC THEATRE.

BURBANK THEATRE STOCK COMPANY. Oliver Morosco (born Oliver Mitchell, 1875-1945) and his brother Leslie entered the entertainment field as acrobats in a circus owned by Walter Morosco, from whom the boys took their professional names. Oliver then assisted Walter Morosco in the management of a theatre featuring vaudeville and "blood-and-thunder" melodrama in San Francisco and San Jose, California. In 1899 at age twenty-three he leased the perennially bankrupt Burbank Theatre (built in 1893), where he featured the T. Daniel Frawley Company for a profitable eight-week season. Over the next three years, Morosco engaged touring single-play companies as well as traveling groups with a repertory of plays. His experience with the [James] Neill Stock Company*, with Frawley's reliable group, and with a short-lived troupe he organized in partnership with his brother Leslie (by 1900 a successful San Francisco theatre manager) convinced Morosco that a permanent stock company would enhance the profitability of the Burbank Theatre. On June 26, 1904, he announced the opening of the Oliver Morosco Stock Company, as it was called at first. The Morosco Company was to play continually in the Burbank Theatre for the next thirteen years. In 1917, it was disbanded and its members absorbed into the new Morosco Stock Company* which flourished until 1928.

Morosco's major competition came from the Belasco Theatre Stock Company, established in 1904 by Frederick Belasco, owner and manager of the highly successful Alcazar Theatre Stock Company* in San Francisco. When, in 1906, Belasco scored a coup by temporarily cornering the Los Angeles market for stock plays managed by New York agents, Morosco, in desperation, produced plays by local authors. In South Car'liney, written by Morosco and Henry Cottrell and first produced the week of January 15, 1905, confirmed Morosco's belief that he could sell new plays to Los Angeles.

By 1908 Morosco was being deluged by new plays from unknown and unproduced playwrights. He searched in vain for four years for usable commercial

-68-

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American Theatre Companies, 1888-1930
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • A 1
  • Bibliography 4
  • Bibliography 8
  • Bibliography 13
  • Bibliography 22
  • Bibliography 24
  • Bibliography 27
  • Bibliography 31
  • Bibliography 36
  • Bibliography 38
  • Bibliography 40
  • B 41
  • Bibliography 51
  • Bibliography 55
  • Bibliography 61
  • Bibliography 63
  • Bibliography 68
  • Bibliography 72
  • C 73
  • Bibliography 80
  • Bibliography 86
  • Bibliography 90
  • Bibliography 94
  • Bibliography 97
  • D 99
  • Bibliography 103
  • Bibliography 111
  • Bibliography 118
  • Bibliography 126
  • Bibliography 134
  • Bibliography 140
  • Bibliography 145
  • Bibliography 150
  • Bibliography 152
  • Bibliography 158
  • E 159
  • F 165
  • Bibliography 168
  • Bibliography 171
  • Bibliography 177
  • G 179
  • Bibliography 181
  • Bibliography 183
  • Bibliography 188
  • Bibliography 190
  • Bibliography 194
  • Bibliography 197
  • Bibliography 203
  • H 205
  • Bibliography 208
  • Bibliography 210
  • Bibliography 212
  • Bibliography 220
  • Bibliography 225
  • Bibliography 227
  • Bibliography 231
  • I 233
  • PERSONNEL 237
  • J 239
  • Bibliography 241
  • Bibliography 243
  • K 245
  • Bibliography 247
  • L 249
  • Bibliography 253
  • Bibliography 260
  • Bibliography 262
  • Bibliography 268
  • Bibliography 276
  • M 277
  • Bibliography 280
  • Bibliography 283
  • Bibliography 284
  • Bibliography 289
  • Bibliography 293
  • Bibliography 297
  • Bibliography 300
  • Bibliography 306
  • Bibliography 309
  • N 311
  • Bibliography 317
  • Bibliography 322
  • Bibliography 325
  • Bibliography 329
  • Bibliography 332
  • Bibliography 338
  • O 341
  • Bibliography 346
  • Bibliography 348
  • P 349
  • Bibliography 353
  • Bibliography 358
  • Bibliography 363
  • Bibliography 367
  • Bibliography 370
  • Bibliography 377
  • Bibliography 388
  • Q 391
  • R 393
  • Bibliography 396
  • Bibliography 399
  • Bibliography 402
  • Bibliography 404
  • S 405
  • Bibliography 407
  • Bibliography 411
  • Bibliography 413
  • Bibliography 416
  • Bibliography 424
  • Bibliography 428
  • Bibliography 432
  • T 433
  • Bibliography 442
  • U 443
  • Bibliography 447
  • V 449
  • Bibliography 453
  • W 455
  • Bibliography 460
  • Bibliography 463
  • Bibliography 470
  • Bibliography 472
  • Bibliography 478
  • Bibliography 482
  • Bibliography 485
  • Bibliography 488
  • Y 489
  • Bibliography 492
  • APPENDIX I CHRONOLOGY OF THEATRE COMPANIES 493
  • APPENDIX II THEATRE COMPANIES BY STATE 497
  • Index of Personal Names and Play Titles 501
  • About the Contributors 535
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