American Theatre Companies, 1888-1930

By Weldon B. Durham | Go to book overview

1919-20: Eyes of Youth, The Thirteenth Chair, Lilac Time, The Confessions of a War Bride, A Fool There Was, The Invisible Foe, De Luxe Annie, The Silent Witness, A Good Bad Woman, Today, The Blue Pearl, Pollyanna, Branded, Blind Youth, The Madonna of the Future, The Challenge, The Return of Eve, The Miracle Man, My Lady's Garter, Please Get Married, The Unborn, After Office Hours, The Marriage Question, The Revolt, (vaudeville acts and motion pictures replaced legitimate drama performances in May and June 1920), The Man Who Owned Broadway, Three Twins.

1920-21: The Crimson Alibi, Fair and Warmer, Confidence, Fifty Years from Now, Dawn of the Mountains, Woman Against Woman, The Heart Breaker, A Little Girl in a Big City, Nothing But the Truth, A Voice in the Dark, The Love of Su Shong, Bought and Paid For, The Ninety and Nine, Peg O' My Heart, Turn to the Right, Lafayette Theatre closed 31 July 1921.


BIBLIOGRAPHY

Unpublished Source:

Thompson Mary Francesca. "The Lafayette Players: 1915-1932." Ph. D. dissertation, University of Michigan, 1972.

Andrew Vorder Bruegge

[EVA] LANG COMPANY. See DENHAM STOCK COMPANY.

LANG-MILLER STOCK COMPANY. The Lang-Miller Stock Company ( Denver, Colorado), also known as the Miller-Lang Stock Company, was organized in the autumn of 1914 by manager Peter McCourt who held the lease on the Broadway Theatre (a proscenium house, built in 1890, at Broadway and Eighteenth Street, seating 1,630). The company opened November 29, 1914, with a production of The Freedom of Suzanne by Cosmo Gordon-Lenox. The company disbanded in late April 1915.

Peter McCourt was manager of both the Broadway and the Tabor Grand theatres which were devoted to traveling companies and vaudeville. In 1914 Colorado was suffering from miners' strikes and adverse economic conditions; McCourt found it difficult to book traveling shows and to fill both houses at the necessary ticket prices in the face of competition from the Orpheum Theatre, the Denham and Empress Theatre (the popular-priced stock and vaudeville houses), and the inexpensive movie theatres. He organized the resident stock company to provide popular-priced drama (25 to 50 cents) at the Broadway, while retaining the Tabor Grand for traveling productions. The company was in direct competition with the Denham Stock Company*, which was the established popular-priced drama emporium of Denver.

McCourt organized the company around Eva Lang and Charles Miller from whom the company took its name. Lang was a wise choice, for she had been the leading woman at the Denham Theatre the previous season: her talents were well known to the Denver public and she was enormously popular.

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American Theatre Companies, 1888-1930
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • A 1
  • Bibliography 4
  • Bibliography 8
  • Bibliography 13
  • Bibliography 22
  • Bibliography 24
  • Bibliography 27
  • Bibliography 31
  • Bibliography 36
  • Bibliography 38
  • Bibliography 40
  • B 41
  • Bibliography 51
  • Bibliography 55
  • Bibliography 61
  • Bibliography 63
  • Bibliography 68
  • Bibliography 72
  • C 73
  • Bibliography 80
  • Bibliography 86
  • Bibliography 90
  • Bibliography 94
  • Bibliography 97
  • D 99
  • Bibliography 103
  • Bibliography 111
  • Bibliography 118
  • Bibliography 126
  • Bibliography 134
  • Bibliography 140
  • Bibliography 145
  • Bibliography 150
  • Bibliography 152
  • Bibliography 158
  • E 159
  • F 165
  • Bibliography 168
  • Bibliography 171
  • Bibliography 177
  • G 179
  • Bibliography 181
  • Bibliography 183
  • Bibliography 188
  • Bibliography 190
  • Bibliography 194
  • Bibliography 197
  • Bibliography 203
  • H 205
  • Bibliography 208
  • Bibliography 210
  • Bibliography 212
  • Bibliography 220
  • Bibliography 225
  • Bibliography 227
  • Bibliography 231
  • I 233
  • PERSONNEL 237
  • J 239
  • Bibliography 241
  • Bibliography 243
  • K 245
  • Bibliography 247
  • L 249
  • Bibliography 253
  • Bibliography 260
  • Bibliography 262
  • Bibliography 268
  • Bibliography 276
  • M 277
  • Bibliography 280
  • Bibliography 283
  • Bibliography 284
  • Bibliography 289
  • Bibliography 293
  • Bibliography 297
  • Bibliography 300
  • Bibliography 306
  • Bibliography 309
  • N 311
  • Bibliography 317
  • Bibliography 322
  • Bibliography 325
  • Bibliography 329
  • Bibliography 332
  • Bibliography 338
  • O 341
  • Bibliography 346
  • Bibliography 348
  • P 349
  • Bibliography 353
  • Bibliography 358
  • Bibliography 363
  • Bibliography 367
  • Bibliography 370
  • Bibliography 377
  • Bibliography 388
  • Q 391
  • R 393
  • Bibliography 396
  • Bibliography 399
  • Bibliography 402
  • Bibliography 404
  • S 405
  • Bibliography 407
  • Bibliography 411
  • Bibliography 413
  • Bibliography 416
  • Bibliography 424
  • Bibliography 428
  • Bibliography 432
  • T 433
  • Bibliography 442
  • U 443
  • Bibliography 447
  • V 449
  • Bibliography 453
  • W 455
  • Bibliography 460
  • Bibliography 463
  • Bibliography 470
  • Bibliography 472
  • Bibliography 478
  • Bibliography 482
  • Bibliography 485
  • Bibliography 488
  • Y 489
  • Bibliography 492
  • APPENDIX I CHRONOLOGY OF THEATRE COMPANIES 493
  • APPENDIX II THEATRE COMPANIES BY STATE 497
  • Index of Personal Names and Play Titles 501
  • About the Contributors 535
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