American Theatre Companies, 1888-1930

By Weldon B. Durham | Go to book overview

1902-3: Marta of the Lowlands.

1903-4: The Proud Laird.

1904-5: Mary and John, Monna Vanna.

1905-6: Thérèse Raquin, The Kreutzer Sonata.


BIBLIOGRAPHY

Unpublished Source:

Webb J. Edgar. "Harrison Grey Fiske's Management of the Manhattan Theatre, 1901- 1906". Ph.D., dissertation, Indiana University, 1971.

Archival Resources:

New York, New York. New York Public Library. Theatre Collection. Robinson Locke Collection.

Washington, D.C. Library of Congress. The Fiske Papers.

J. Edgar Webb

MANHATTAN PLAYERS. The Manhattan Players entertained audiences in the western New York city of Rochester for ten consecutive seasons from 1913 through 1922. Despite Rochester's growing population, totaling approximately 150,000 in 1915, it was not considered a favorable environment for resident winter stock theatre. Rochesterians apparently preferred traveling vaudeville, burlesque, and New York-based road shows to the sort of local stock company that was prevalent in so many eastern cities and towns during the first quarter of the twentieth century. The few stock organizations that had attempted residence did not prosper, and local theatre owners discouraged any new endeavors.

The surprising longevity of the Manhattan Players in Rochester attested to the cunning of the company's initial proprietors, John W. Rumsey and Edgar J. MacGregor. Rather than attempt to change winter-season audience habits, they decided to promote stock organization as alternative spring and summer entertainment. During the summer, theatres were plentiful, rentals were lower, and Broadway actors were often available for local engagements. Summer dramatic presentation was certainly not unheard of; however, the majority of theatres throughout the country continued to either close their doors or convert to motion picture or musical variety during the hottest summer months. Extended summer stock seasons were not yet a national vogue when the Manhattan Players opened at Rochester's Lyceum Theatre in the spring of 1913 with an April through August roster.

In the realms of organization, repertory, and ticket prices, the Manhattan Players adhered to standard stock company procedures. The company's actors were each proficient in a stock role and performed this role in a new play each week. Comedy was the primary genre of play presented. Their predilection for comedy and farce was more pronounced than in typical winter stock repertories: at that time, it was a theatrical dictum that summer audiences demanded light, frothy entertainment. The Manhattan Players chose to present primarily recent Broadway successes by popular playwrights such as George M. Cohan, Margaret

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American Theatre Companies, 1888-1930
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • A 1
  • Bibliography 4
  • Bibliography 8
  • Bibliography 13
  • Bibliography 22
  • Bibliography 24
  • Bibliography 27
  • Bibliography 31
  • Bibliography 36
  • Bibliography 38
  • Bibliography 40
  • B 41
  • Bibliography 51
  • Bibliography 55
  • Bibliography 61
  • Bibliography 63
  • Bibliography 68
  • Bibliography 72
  • C 73
  • Bibliography 80
  • Bibliography 86
  • Bibliography 90
  • Bibliography 94
  • Bibliography 97
  • D 99
  • Bibliography 103
  • Bibliography 111
  • Bibliography 118
  • Bibliography 126
  • Bibliography 134
  • Bibliography 140
  • Bibliography 145
  • Bibliography 150
  • Bibliography 152
  • Bibliography 158
  • E 159
  • F 165
  • Bibliography 168
  • Bibliography 171
  • Bibliography 177
  • G 179
  • Bibliography 181
  • Bibliography 183
  • Bibliography 188
  • Bibliography 190
  • Bibliography 194
  • Bibliography 197
  • Bibliography 203
  • H 205
  • Bibliography 208
  • Bibliography 210
  • Bibliography 212
  • Bibliography 220
  • Bibliography 225
  • Bibliography 227
  • Bibliography 231
  • I 233
  • PERSONNEL 237
  • J 239
  • Bibliography 241
  • Bibliography 243
  • K 245
  • Bibliography 247
  • L 249
  • Bibliography 253
  • Bibliography 260
  • Bibliography 262
  • Bibliography 268
  • Bibliography 276
  • M 277
  • Bibliography 280
  • Bibliography 283
  • Bibliography 284
  • Bibliography 289
  • Bibliography 293
  • Bibliography 297
  • Bibliography 300
  • Bibliography 306
  • Bibliography 309
  • N 311
  • Bibliography 317
  • Bibliography 322
  • Bibliography 325
  • Bibliography 329
  • Bibliography 332
  • Bibliography 338
  • O 341
  • Bibliography 346
  • Bibliography 348
  • P 349
  • Bibliography 353
  • Bibliography 358
  • Bibliography 363
  • Bibliography 367
  • Bibliography 370
  • Bibliography 377
  • Bibliography 388
  • Q 391
  • R 393
  • Bibliography 396
  • Bibliography 399
  • Bibliography 402
  • Bibliography 404
  • S 405
  • Bibliography 407
  • Bibliography 411
  • Bibliography 413
  • Bibliography 416
  • Bibliography 424
  • Bibliography 428
  • Bibliography 432
  • T 433
  • Bibliography 442
  • U 443
  • Bibliography 447
  • V 449
  • Bibliography 453
  • W 455
  • Bibliography 460
  • Bibliography 463
  • Bibliography 470
  • Bibliography 472
  • Bibliography 478
  • Bibliography 482
  • Bibliography 485
  • Bibliography 488
  • Y 489
  • Bibliography 492
  • APPENDIX I CHRONOLOGY OF THEATRE COMPANIES 493
  • APPENDIX II THEATRE COMPANIES BY STATE 497
  • Index of Personal Names and Play Titles 501
  • About the Contributors 535
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