American Theatre Companies, 1888-1930

By Weldon B. Durham | Go to book overview

1927: Kiss in a Taxi, Easy Come, Easy Go, The Poor Nut, Synthetic Sin, One of the Family, The Patsy, The Creaking Chair, Sure Fire, High Stakes, American Born, The Last of Mrs. Cheyney, Seventh Heaven, Hell's Bells, Connie Goes Home, Sinner, The Night Cap, My Country, Gertie, The Four Flusher.

1928: Grounds for Divorce, Oh Mama, Funny Little Thing, Service for Two, Wasp's Nest, The Dust Heap, The Marquise.


BIBLIOGRAPHY

Published Sources:

Billboard, December 6, 1919-December 27, 1930.

California Graphic, Aguust 22, 1925-September 1928.

Los Angeles Evening-Express, March 13, 1923-December 31, 1929.

Los Angeles Examiner, January 1, 1920-December 31, 1929.

Los Angeles Times, January 1, 1919-March 15, 1931.

Variety, March 7, 1919-July 30, 1930.

Unpublished Sources:

Bokar Camille N. R. "An Historical Sutdy of the Legitimate Theatre in Los Angeles, 1920-1929, and Its Relation to the National Theatrical Scene." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Southern California, 1973.

Schoen Leonard. "A Historical Study of Oliver Morosco's Long Run Premiere Productions in Los Angeles, 1905-1922." Ph.D. dissertation, University of Southern California, 1971.

Sorrells Roy W. "The Los Angeles Theatre Activities of Oliver Morosco." Master's thesis, California State University, Long Beach, 1966. Details the history of the Morosco Theatre Stock Company from 1913 to 1922.

Camille N. R. Bokar and Weldon B. Durham

MOZART PLAYERS. The Mozart Players heralded the return of dramatic stock to Elmira, New York's Mozart Theatre when they opened there on Labor Day, 1914. Built in 1908, the Mozart Theatre, located at 311-313 East Market Street between Baldwin and Lake streets, had been the home of two resident stock companies from 1910 to 1912: the Robyns and Dorner Players and the Stanford and Western Players. However, when the White Rats of America, purchased the theatre in 1912, it became a vaudeville and motion picture house. Apparently Elmirans were not satisfied with this situation, for several Elmira businessmen banded together in 1914 to purchase the theatre and reopen it to a stock organization.

The Mozart was renovated in the summer of 1914 under the eye of the theatre's new manager, Malcolm D. Gibson. Gibson also owned and managed Elmira's vaudeville theatre, the Majestic. Orchestra and balcony boxes were constructed and a new Smith two-manual pipe organ was installed. Advertised as having the unique capability of producing the sounds of a forty-two piece orchestra, the organ was an object of local pride. For this reason, musical direction was a focal point for the new resident dramatic company.

-306-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
American Theatre Companies, 1888-1930
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 550

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.