American Theatre Companies, 1888-1930

By Weldon B. Durham | Go to book overview

REPERTORY

1926-27: Polly with a Past, The Song and Dance Man, The Show-Off, The Gorilla, The Girl from Childs, The Clinging Vine, White Collars, Meet the Wife. Laff That Off, The Seventh Guest, Adam and Eva, Way Down East, The Man Who Came Back, Square Crooks, It's a Boy, Lightnin', The Gingham Girl, Is Zat So?, The Cave Girl, Kempy, The Woman He Married, The Charity Ball, For All of Us, Dear Me. The Patsy, The Silent Witness, Puppy Love, Blind Youth, Hush Money, Sure Fire, Rolling Stones, Charley's Aunt, Seventh Heaven, Hell's Belles, She Walked in Her Sleep, One Day, The Fall Guy, The Marriage of Kitty, Mary's Ankle.

1927-28: The Little Spitfire, The Ghost Train, If I Was Rich, The Last of Mrs. Cheyney, Aloma of the South Seas, New Brooms, Alias the Deacon, Gertie, The Butter and Egg Man, Smilin' Through, The Unseen Way, Sis Hopkins, The Rejuvenation of Aunt Mary, Up in Mabel's Room, I Love You, The Girl from Out Yonder, Cradle Snatchers, Mary's Other Husband, What Ann Brought Home, Little Jessie James, Take My Advice, White Cargo, Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, The Noose, Tangerine, Easy Come, Easy Go, Pigs, Love 'Em and Leave 'Em, Tommy, She Couldn't Say No.


BIBLIOGRAPHY

Published Sources:

Billboard, 1926-28. Schenectady Gazette, 1926-28. Hart Larry. Schenectady's Golden Era, 1880-1930. Scotia, New York: Old Dorp Books, 1974.

Mari Kathleen Fielder

ROBERSON-GIFFORD PLAYERS. The Roberson-Gifford Players ( Duluth, Minnesota), also known as the Orpheum Players, was owned and managed by George C. Roberson and Eskell G. Gifford and engaged by the Blackmore brothers to play at Duluth's Orpheum Theatre. The indefinite run was opened on February 19, 1927, with the Barry Conners comedy The Patsy.

Duluth, which was one of the boomtowns of the early twentieth century, had always been a theatre town. In addition to being a regular stop for road shows, it had hosted many small stock companies. The Roberson-Gifford Players were preceded in Duluth by the Ferris Comedians*, the Elliot-Courtnay Stock Company, the Northwestern Opera Company, the Melbourne MacDowell Stock Company, the Gus A. Forbes Stock Company, the Mack-Leone Stock Company*, and the Baldwin Players*. Only the Ferris, Mack-Leone, and Baldwin organizations had runs of more than a few weeks.

Sidney and Ernest Blackmore, lessees of the Orpheum, leased and/or owned and operated a number of theatres in Minnesota. At the time their company opened in Duluth, Roberson and Gifford were or had been operating stock companies in Erie, Pittsburgh, Butler, and Lancaster, Pennsylvania; Peoria and Springfield, Illinois; Madison and Superior, Wisconsin; and Hamilton, Ohio. Roberson and Gifford as well as their stage director, Francis Sayles, had been active in stock theatre throughout the Midwest. An early Gifford company had held the boards of the Palace Theatre in Superior, Wisconsin, for fifteen weeks

-399-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
American Theatre Companies, 1888-1930
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • A 1
  • Bibliography 4
  • Bibliography 8
  • Bibliography 13
  • Bibliography 22
  • Bibliography 24
  • Bibliography 27
  • Bibliography 31
  • Bibliography 36
  • Bibliography 38
  • Bibliography 40
  • B 41
  • Bibliography 51
  • Bibliography 55
  • Bibliography 61
  • Bibliography 63
  • Bibliography 68
  • Bibliography 72
  • C 73
  • Bibliography 80
  • Bibliography 86
  • Bibliography 90
  • Bibliography 94
  • Bibliography 97
  • D 99
  • Bibliography 103
  • Bibliography 111
  • Bibliography 118
  • Bibliography 126
  • Bibliography 134
  • Bibliography 140
  • Bibliography 145
  • Bibliography 150
  • Bibliography 152
  • Bibliography 158
  • E 159
  • F 165
  • Bibliography 168
  • Bibliography 171
  • Bibliography 177
  • G 179
  • Bibliography 181
  • Bibliography 183
  • Bibliography 188
  • Bibliography 190
  • Bibliography 194
  • Bibliography 197
  • Bibliography 203
  • H 205
  • Bibliography 208
  • Bibliography 210
  • Bibliography 212
  • Bibliography 220
  • Bibliography 225
  • Bibliography 227
  • Bibliography 231
  • I 233
  • PERSONNEL 237
  • J 239
  • Bibliography 241
  • Bibliography 243
  • K 245
  • Bibliography 247
  • L 249
  • Bibliography 253
  • Bibliography 260
  • Bibliography 262
  • Bibliography 268
  • Bibliography 276
  • M 277
  • Bibliography 280
  • Bibliography 283
  • Bibliography 284
  • Bibliography 289
  • Bibliography 293
  • Bibliography 297
  • Bibliography 300
  • Bibliography 306
  • Bibliography 309
  • N 311
  • Bibliography 317
  • Bibliography 322
  • Bibliography 325
  • Bibliography 329
  • Bibliography 332
  • Bibliography 338
  • O 341
  • Bibliography 346
  • Bibliography 348
  • P 349
  • Bibliography 353
  • Bibliography 358
  • Bibliography 363
  • Bibliography 367
  • Bibliography 370
  • Bibliography 377
  • Bibliography 388
  • Q 391
  • R 393
  • Bibliography 396
  • Bibliography 399
  • Bibliography 402
  • Bibliography 404
  • S 405
  • Bibliography 407
  • Bibliography 411
  • Bibliography 413
  • Bibliography 416
  • Bibliography 424
  • Bibliography 428
  • Bibliography 432
  • T 433
  • Bibliography 442
  • U 443
  • Bibliography 447
  • V 449
  • Bibliography 453
  • W 455
  • Bibliography 460
  • Bibliography 463
  • Bibliography 470
  • Bibliography 472
  • Bibliography 478
  • Bibliography 482
  • Bibliography 485
  • Bibliography 488
  • Y 489
  • Bibliography 492
  • APPENDIX I CHRONOLOGY OF THEATRE COMPANIES 493
  • APPENDIX II THEATRE COMPANIES BY STATE 497
  • Index of Personal Names and Play Titles 501
  • About the Contributors 535
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 550

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.