American Theatre Companies, 1888-1930

By Weldon B. Durham | Go to book overview

1907-8: The Jungle, Esmeralda, Two Little Sailor Boys, The Rocky Road to Dublin, Jerome, a Poor Man, How Baxter Butted In, Under Two Flags, The Girl Patsy, The Undertow, The Man from Missouri, The Real Man, Mizpah, Camille, Michael Strogoff, The Girl of Eagle Ranch, The Lily and the Prince, A Milk White Flag, The Primrose Path, The Judge and the Jury, Woman Against Woman, A Runaway Match, Zaza.

1908-9: It's All Your Fault, The Three of Us, A Child of the State, A Gilded Fool, The Holy City, The Garrison Girl, The Devil, The Girl from Out Yonder, Hello Bin, Leah Kleschna, The Golden Rule, Why Girls Leave Home, Under the Gaslight, A Romance of Coon Hollow, The King of the Cowboys, Sunday, Jim the Westerner, La Belle Marie, Fogg's Ferry, The Plunger, When Knighthood Was in Flower, Love Route, A Fly in the Honey (curtain raiser), The Baby Chase.

1911-12: The Lion and the Mouse, The Little Minister, Before and After, Wildfire, The Commanding Officer, The Burglar's Daughter, The Girl of Eagle Ranch, What Happened to Jones?, The Dairy Farmers, Maud Muller, The Girl Raffles, The Rocky Road to Dublin, One Girl in a Thousand.


BIBLIOGRAPHY

Published Sources:

New York Dramatic Mirror, 1905-9.

Spokane Spokesman-Review, 1902-12.

Kalez Jay J. Saga of a Western Town Spokane. Spokane: Lawton Printing, Inc., 1972

-----. This Town of Ours . . . Spokane. Spokane: Lawton Printing, Inc., 1973.

Archival Resources:

Spokane, Washington. Library of the Eastern Washington State Historical Society. Ed K. Kohlauff, "Fifty Years of Theatre in Spokane," manuscript, 1934; programs.

Laurilyn J. Harris

[EMILY] SMILEY AND THE STANFORD PLAYERS. Emily Smiley and her partner, Maurice Stanford, were actively involved in many East Coast stock- company enterprises during the first two decades of the twentieth century. Most often, this husband-and-wife team leased a specific theatre and then formed a resident company to occupy it. Their primary center of activity was the Philadelphia-South New Jersey area. With some variations, their companies were called either the Emily Smiley Stock Company or Emily Smiley and the Stanford Players. At some points, the two formed a partnership with actor Earl T. Western. The company was then named the Stanford-Western Players. Invariably, Stanford acted as manager or stage director while Smiley assumed the position of leading lady.

Of their early efforts, the resident Stanford and Western Stock Company at Philadelphia's Empire Theatre is most significant. The Empire Theatre, located at the corner of Frankford Avenue and Meadow Street, was considered a "suburban" theatre. Because it was located a great distance from central Philadelphia, the theatre could attract only lesser-quality touring productions. Smiley and Stanford attempted to capitalize on the lack of decent entertainment

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American Theatre Companies, 1888-1930
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • A 1
  • Bibliography 4
  • Bibliography 8
  • Bibliography 13
  • Bibliography 22
  • Bibliography 24
  • Bibliography 27
  • Bibliography 31
  • Bibliography 36
  • Bibliography 38
  • Bibliography 40
  • B 41
  • Bibliography 51
  • Bibliography 55
  • Bibliography 61
  • Bibliography 63
  • Bibliography 68
  • Bibliography 72
  • C 73
  • Bibliography 80
  • Bibliography 86
  • Bibliography 90
  • Bibliography 94
  • Bibliography 97
  • D 99
  • Bibliography 103
  • Bibliography 111
  • Bibliography 118
  • Bibliography 126
  • Bibliography 134
  • Bibliography 140
  • Bibliography 145
  • Bibliography 150
  • Bibliography 152
  • Bibliography 158
  • E 159
  • F 165
  • Bibliography 168
  • Bibliography 171
  • Bibliography 177
  • G 179
  • Bibliography 181
  • Bibliography 183
  • Bibliography 188
  • Bibliography 190
  • Bibliography 194
  • Bibliography 197
  • Bibliography 203
  • H 205
  • Bibliography 208
  • Bibliography 210
  • Bibliography 212
  • Bibliography 220
  • Bibliography 225
  • Bibliography 227
  • Bibliography 231
  • I 233
  • PERSONNEL 237
  • J 239
  • Bibliography 241
  • Bibliography 243
  • K 245
  • Bibliography 247
  • L 249
  • Bibliography 253
  • Bibliography 260
  • Bibliography 262
  • Bibliography 268
  • Bibliography 276
  • M 277
  • Bibliography 280
  • Bibliography 283
  • Bibliography 284
  • Bibliography 289
  • Bibliography 293
  • Bibliography 297
  • Bibliography 300
  • Bibliography 306
  • Bibliography 309
  • N 311
  • Bibliography 317
  • Bibliography 322
  • Bibliography 325
  • Bibliography 329
  • Bibliography 332
  • Bibliography 338
  • O 341
  • Bibliography 346
  • Bibliography 348
  • P 349
  • Bibliography 353
  • Bibliography 358
  • Bibliography 363
  • Bibliography 367
  • Bibliography 370
  • Bibliography 377
  • Bibliography 388
  • Q 391
  • R 393
  • Bibliography 396
  • Bibliography 399
  • Bibliography 402
  • Bibliography 404
  • S 405
  • Bibliography 407
  • Bibliography 411
  • Bibliography 413
  • Bibliography 416
  • Bibliography 424
  • Bibliography 428
  • Bibliography 432
  • T 433
  • Bibliography 442
  • U 443
  • Bibliography 447
  • V 449
  • Bibliography 453
  • W 455
  • Bibliography 460
  • Bibliography 463
  • Bibliography 470
  • Bibliography 472
  • Bibliography 478
  • Bibliography 482
  • Bibliography 485
  • Bibliography 488
  • Y 489
  • Bibliography 492
  • APPENDIX I CHRONOLOGY OF THEATRE COMPANIES 493
  • APPENDIX II THEATRE COMPANIES BY STATE 497
  • Index of Personal Names and Play Titles 501
  • About the Contributors 535
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