American Theatre Companies, 1888-1930

By Weldon B. Durham | Go to book overview

U

UNIVERSITY PLAYERS. See University Players Guild.

UNIVERSITY PLAYERS GUILD. The University Players Guild (Falmouth, later West Falmouth, Massachusetts, and Baltimore, Maryland), also known as the University Players, the University Repertory Theatre, and the Theatre Unit, Inc., was organized in 1928 by Charles Leatherbee and Bretaigne Windust. Its first production, A. A. Milne The Dover Road, opened on July 9, 1928, at the Elizabeth Theatre in Falmouth, Massachusetts. As its early theatre was also a conventional movie house that sat 900, its productions ran Monday and Tuesday evenings, with films being presented Wednesday through Saturday. In 1929 the company built its own theatre in West Falmouth: the Old Silver Beach Theatre had a proscenium stage with orchestra pit, full counterweight system, trapped stage, and a seating capacity of 400. This building remained its permanent base of operations from 1929 to 1932.

This resident summer stock company, later to be also a resident repertory company in Baltimore, Maryland, was unique for several reasons. Essentially, this company provided a training ground for many young, inexperienced actors who had elected to attend college (a requirement to participate in the company) instead of immediately attempting to pursue their professional careers in New York or Hollywood. Henry Fonda, Margaret Sullavan, Joshua Logan, Jimmy Stewart, Mildred Natwick, and Norris Houghton were some of the many University Players who went on to successful theatrical careers in New York and Hollywood. Attempting to expand its horizons, the company established a winter resident repertory company in Baltimore from 1930 to 1932. Here, it met its first professional competition. Two touring companies, Three's a Crowd (with Clifton Webb, Libby Holman, and Fred Allen) and Private Lives (with Noel Coward and Gertrude Lawrence), as well as productions by the Theatre Guild and the Group Theatre provided strong competition for the young University

-443-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
American Theatre Companies, 1888-1930
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 550

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.