Adopting and Advocating for the Special Needs Child: A Guide for Parents and Professionals

By L. Anne Babb; Rita Laws | Go to book overview
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CHAPTER 3 Finding a Child

Religion that God our Father accepts as pure and faultless is this: to look after orphans and widows in their distress and to keep oneself from being polluted by the world.

-- The Holy Bible, James 1:27 (NIV)

Where do prospective parents find adoptable children with special needs? They find them in waiting child magazine columns, on television, and at open-to-the-public staffings held at the local state adoption agency office. They may hear about them first from a social worker. Sometimes, they meet the children in their everyday lives, as Rita met a waiting child who was one of her fifth-grade students. The most common way of finding children with special needs who are available for adoption is through a system called photolisting.


ADOPTION PHOTOLISTING

One of the most creative and effective methods ever devised to recruit families for our nation's waiting children is called the photolisting book. Consisting of a simple binder containing hole-punched paper for easy removal, this matching tool has proven to be highly successful in the 25 years since its inception. Each page has the photo and description of a different child or sibling group waiting to be adopted or sometimes even of a family waiting for a child. Photolistings are meant to be used by families and adoption workers to match children with families willing to adopt. Many different states maintain photolisting books, and there are regional, national, and international books also. Some photolisting books have even gone "on-line" and can be seen

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