The Evolution of Educational Theory in the United States

By Dickson A. Mungazi | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

In the process of writing a book that covers the development of education for a period of three hundred years, one must rely on historical materials that one obtains from different sources, such as books, journals, and so forth. For this reason, the author wishes to thank the Interlibrary Loan System for making it possible to secure the materials needed to produce this study. He also wishes to thank the Library of Congress for allowing access to public materials needed to complete this study.

The author also wishes to thank several of his colleagues at Northern Arizona University for the support and encouragement they have given him. He is also grateful to members of the National Social Science Association, the Association of Third World Studies, and the Comparative and International Studies Society for the encouragement given while he was presenting papers at professional conferences during the past decade. The idea for this project came from those papers. The author wishes to express his special gratitude to L. Kay Walker, his colleague and professor in the Center for Excellence in Education, for allowing him access to rare books that formed an important part of the materials needed to complete this study.

The author also thanks Betty Russell in the Center for Excellence in Education at Northern Arizona University for programming the computer to produce the manuscript more efficiently. His special gratitude goes to Carolyn Hardison of Arlington, Arizona, for allowing him access to personal correspondence of her great grandmother, Janie Kerr, who was a teacher in Missouri in 1885. The author found this correspondence inspiring and insightful about conditions of employment for women as teachers during the nineteenth century. The author also wishes to thank Sandra Feldman, president of the American Federation of Teachers since May 6, 1997, for send

-xix-

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The Evolution of Educational Theory in the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Preface xv
  • Acknowledgments xix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Origins of the Theory of Western Education 15
  • Notes 34
  • 2 - Theory During the Colonial Period 37
  • Notes 57
  • 3 - Theory During the Revolutionary Period 61
  • Notes 80
  • 4 - Theory During the Common School Movement 83
  • 5 - The Theory of Secondary, Higher, and Teacher Education 103
  • Notes 121
  • 6 - The Courts and the Theory of Education for African Americans 125
  • 7 - Theory to Address National Problems: From Warren G. Harding to Bill Clinton 153
  • Notes 181
  • Conclusion 210
  • Notes 211
  • Selected Bibliography 215
  • Index 237
  • About the Author 251
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