The Evolution of Educational Theory in the United States

By Dickson A. Mungazi | Go to book overview

conducted research and wrote dissertations as part of meeting requirements for doctoral degrees. They were also encourages to become members of professional organizations. This is the practice that is followed today.


SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION

This chapter traced the evolution of theory of education from the Latin Grammar school to teacher education. The evolution of this theory was heavily influenced by changing conditions in the country, different stages of its development from the colonial period to the present. This suggests the conclusion that theory must change because conditions keep changing. The evolution of this theory led to specific developments that had a profound impact on both education and society. The change from the Latin Grammar school, through the academy, to the emergence of the modern high school, was a reflection of this evolution. In the same way, the evolution of theory to address change from normal school to professional school was also a result of change in the conditions that affected it. The ability of the nation to adjust to both evolution of theory and change of conditions is the engine that moves the national vehicle forward.


NOTES
1.
Robert E. Potter, The Stream of American Education ( New York: American Book Company, 1967), p. 160.
2.
John D. Pulliam, History of Educational in America, 5th ed. ( New York: Merrill, 1991), p. 66.
3.
Gerald L. Gutek, An Historical Introduction to American Education (Prospect Heights, IL: Waveland Press, 1991), p. 99.
4.
This was the origin of one-room and one-teacher schools that continued to operate until the 20th century. The author saw a few of these schools in Iowa and Nebraska in 1961.
5.
Guteck, An Historical Introduction to American Education, p. 101.
6.
Potter, The Stream of American Education, p. 161.
7.
Quoted in Potter, The Stream of American Education, p. 161.
8.
John D. Pulliam and James van Pattern, History of Education in America, 6th ed. (Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Merill, 1995), p. 66.
10.
Theodore R. Sizer, The Age of Academies ( New York: Bureau of Publications, Teachers College, 1962). Quoted in Gutek, An Historical Introduction to American Education, p. 99.
11.
This author recalls that when he went to high school in Zimbabwe in 1956, Latin was one of the core subjects his class was required to study. There were two American Methodist missionary teachers who taught it. One of them, Edith Parks, who had studied Latin in college in Michigan, told the student she regretted the decision by U.S. schools to drop Latin in the 1920's, when she went to college, from being a required course.

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The Evolution of Educational Theory in the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Preface xv
  • Acknowledgments xix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Origins of the Theory of Western Education 15
  • Notes 34
  • 2 - Theory During the Colonial Period 37
  • Notes 57
  • 3 - Theory During the Revolutionary Period 61
  • Notes 80
  • 4 - Theory During the Common School Movement 83
  • 5 - The Theory of Secondary, Higher, and Teacher Education 103
  • Notes 121
  • 6 - The Courts and the Theory of Education for African Americans 125
  • 7 - Theory to Address National Problems: From Warren G. Harding to Bill Clinton 153
  • Notes 181
  • Conclusion 210
  • Notes 211
  • Selected Bibliography 215
  • Index 237
  • About the Author 251
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