Handbook of Contemporary Developments in World Sociology

By Raj P. Mohan; Don Martindale | Go to book overview

7
Contemporary Sociology
in Austria

By Joseph H. Bunzel

In principle I am no friend of classifying sociology by national schools. 1 This is especially true of present-day work, with its intertwined rapid communication and its frequently unoriginal eclecticism. Only too often such articles read like the telephone directory of a city that you will never visit and probably do not wish to visit. However, having accepted the assignment it seems imperative to return to the origins and the wellsprings of, in our case, Austrian sociology, one of the seminal European sociologisms, deeply steeped in the tradition of legal, natural scientific realism.

Austrian sociology as such is probably one of the least known of all national schools. Its founder, Ludwig Gumplowicz, is usually counted as a social Darwinist. Moreover, he is claimed by Poland, 2 and in the review by Durkheim, 3 is referred to as a German sociologist. Recent interest in him and his work in this country centers largely on two misunderstandings: (a) that Gumplowicz was a racist in the sense in which the word is understood nearly one hundred years later in the United States, and (b) that he is a representative, if not the founder, of conflict theory in sociology--well known, of course, in philosophy--again in the sense in which is has been accepted and is being used by neo-, pseudo-, and crypto-Marxists of today. Neither is correct. His importance for sociology lies in his stress on the group as the proper study for sociology and in his legal and political work, especially his trail-blazing studies in administrative law. This of course entails a good bit of conflict- theoretical thinking but nothing of the extent of his great adversary Marx. Gumplowicz's major disciple was Gustav Ratzenhofer, who has made a lasting impression on the early Chicago school. 4

There seems to be no unifying bond among the many scholars who have been writing and in fact teaching sociology in Austria. Neither in the Austro- Hungarian monarchy, nor in the much reduced state that remained after 1918. There was even less unity among the hundreds of scholars who went out from there, first from the state of 200 million and then from the state of six million that we know today. The first and second Austrian schools remained pillars of socio-political systems in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century.

-83-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Handbook of Contemporary Developments in World Sociology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 496

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.