Return of the Buffalo: The Story behind America's Indian Gaming Explosion

By Ambrose I. Lane | Go to book overview

Introduction

When it became apparent to the Nevada and New Jersey gaming interests that Indian gaming might continue to expand, billionaire Donald Trump immediately went public to demand the Congress do something to stop its growth. With an obvious eye for the well-turned phrase, the lawyer for the Connecticut Indian Tribe targeted by Trump's wrath instantly labeled the legislation the "Donald Trump Welfare Act". But the humor was short lived. It has now become apparent that the Trump assault on Indian tribes who have built up gaming on their reservations is just a beginning.

As of this writing, two Nevada Senators, Harry Reid and Richard H. Bryan, joined by New Jersey Congressman Robert Tonicelli, the instant patriot, are pushing legislation that will fulfill Mr. Trump's wishes, at least as it concerns Indians.

Torricelli, the good Congressman who labors overtime for his masters in Atlantic City and elsewhere, has had the temerity to offer as his rationale for tightening the screws on Indian tribes his fear that organized crime might infiltrate Indian gaming. This is the same cry one hears from the Nevada gang.

I think it a fascinating commentary on America and American society that Mr. Trump, who has most likely never missed a meal in his life, is asking for government intervention to further impoverish Indian people, many of whom still have trouble securing a minimum of one meal a day -- on good days.

Heaven knows that those of us out here in America may not be swayed by such sophistry, but one should not bet much of one's life's savings on whether or not this argument will convince members of Congress during the current legislative session.

Greater scams have been sold to the folks in Washington who, when they decide to vote against their own constituents' interests and in favor of the money men, are looking for a semi-plausible reason to offer when asked how they could possibly vote as they did.

-xvii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Return of the Buffalo: The Story behind America's Indian Gaming Explosion
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 190

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.