Cognitive Styles and Classroom Learning

By Harry Morgan | Go to book overview

animals, etc.). They also learn that things can be further identified beyond class--flower, chair, adults, and dogs or cats, for example. Prior to classification and sorting tasks commonly administered to measure conceptualization, the chronological stages of development where symbolic representation is acquired must obviously be reached.

Among the various interrelationships between and among cognitive styles, there appears to be an important interaction between certain elements of scanning and reflective/impulsivity. It has been reported from several studies that the error rate of children who approach problem solving with impulsivity can be significantly reduced if they are taught scanning procedures. In the process, such individuals are able to increase response time (be more reflective) and reduce the rate of error ( Drake, 1970; Siegelman, 1969; Egeland, 1974).


REFERENCES

Allport Gordon. ( 1937). Personality: A Psychological Interpretation. New York: Henry Holt and Company.

Aschkenasy J. R. and Odom R. D. ( 1982). "Classification and Perceptual Development: Exploring Issues About Integrality and Different Sensitivity." Journal of Experimental Child Psychology 34, 435-448.

Asher S. R., and Gorman J. M. ( 1981). The Development of Children's Friendships. London: Cambridge University Press.

Bandura A. L. ( 1977). Social Learning Theory. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.

Banks W. C. ( 1976). "White Preference in Blacks: A Paradigm in Search of a Phenomenon." Psychological Bulletin 83, 1179-1186.

Barrera M. E., and Maurer D. ( 1981). "Recognition of Mother's Ph otographed Face by the Three-Month-Old." Child Development 52, 714-716.

Benson J. B., and Uzgiris J. C. ( 1985). "Effect of Self-Initiated Locomotion on Infant Search Activity." Developmental Psychology 21, 923- 931.

Bieri J., Atkins A. L., Briar J. S., Leaman R. L., Miller H., and Tripodi T. ( 1966). Clinical and Social Judgment: The Discrimination of Behavioral Information. New York: Wiley.

Bruner J. S., Goodnow J. J., and Austin G. A. ( 1956). A Study of Thinking. New York: Wiley.

Bruner J. S., and Tajfel H. ( 1961). "Cognitive Risk and Environmental Change." Journal of Abnormal Social Psychology 62, 231-241.

Clayton M. G., and Jackson D. N. ( 1961). "Equivalence Range, Acquiescence, and Over Generalization." Educational and Psychological Measurement 21, 371-382.

Drake D. M. ( 1970). "Perceptual Correlates of Impulsive and Reflective Behavior." Developmental Psychology 2, 202-214.

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Cognitive Styles and Classroom Learning
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Illustrations xi
  • Introduction 1
  • References 8
  • 1 - Philosophical Foundations of Cognitive Style 9
  • References 33
  • 2 - Theoretical Foundations of Cognitive Style 35
  • References 56
  • 3 - Field Independent and Field Dependent Cognitive Styles 61
  • References 82
  • 4 - The Cognitive Style Context of Reflectivity and Impulsivity 89
  • References 103
  • 5 - Cognitive Styles of Conceptualization 109
  • References 114
  • 6 - The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator 117
  • References 126
  • 7 - Cognitive Style of Leveling-Sharpening 129
  • References 135
  • 8 - Conclusion 137
  • References 156
  • Selected Bibliography 161
  • Index 177
  • About the Author 185
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