U.S. Foreign Policy and the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse: Humanitarian Relief in Complex Emergencies

By Andrew S. Natsios | Go to book overview
Save to active project

About the Author

Andrew S. Natsios is vice president of World Vision U.S. and executive director of its technical arm, World Vision Relief and Development (WVRD). He oversees program development, evaluation, and resource acquisition from the U.S. government and private corporate donors for $145 million of relief and development programs in Third World countries and those affected by complex humanitarian emergencies. He is also responsible for World Vision relationships with the U.S. government and Inter- Action on public policy issues.

As assistant administrator for the Bureau of Food and Humanitarian Assistance from 1991 to 1993, Mr. Natsios managed government food aid programs, grants to private voluntary and cooperative development organizations, and U.S.-sponsored schools and hospitals abroad totaling $1.3 billion in fiscal year 1993. Previously, he directed the U.S. Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance and managed the U.S. government response to man-made and natural disasters outside of the United States. Both positions were within the U.S. Agency for International Development.

From 1975 to 1987, Mr. Natsios was a member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives, serving the eighth Middle- sex district just west of Boston on many legislative committees. From 1980 to 1987, he was concurrently chairman of the Massachusetts Republican State Committee.

-xv-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
U.S. Foreign Policy and the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse: Humanitarian Relief in Complex Emergencies
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 192

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?