U.S. Foreign Policy and the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse: Humanitarian Relief in Complex Emergencies

By Andrew S. Natsios | Go to book overview

7
The Policy Influence of the News Media

Lately the news media have been credited with much of what the U.S. government has done to respond to complex emergencies through what has been termed the "CNN effect." In a thoughtful address at the 1994 annual conference of the U.S. Institute for Peace on "Managing Chaos," Ted Koppel suggested that the news media, by their graphic coverage of suffering, had forced an unwilling U.S. government to intervene in Somalia and other emergencies, a view held not only by the news media generally but by many relief organizations as well. According to Koppel, "simple pictures can, and do, have enormous consequences for U.S. foreign policy. Scenes of starving children in Somalia clearly helped precipitate our involvement in that country, just as scenes of that dead Ranger being dragged through the streets of Mogadishu speeded up the timetable for our withdrawal."1

I will argue in this chapter that the so-called CNN effect has taken on more importance than it deserves. In its crudest form it suggests that policymakers respond only when scenes of mass starvation appear on the evening news and, by implication, that they get most of their information about ongoing disasters from media reports. Both propositions are inaccurate, and the causal relationship is greatly exaggerated. The truth is that most complex emergencies receive little media attention at any stage. Usually it is when the disaster response fails and people die en masse that in-depth coverage occurs. 2

-124-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
U.S. Foreign Policy and the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse: Humanitarian Relief in Complex Emergencies
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Foreword xiii
  • About the Author xv
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • Introduction xix
  • 1 - Anatomy of a Complex Humanitarian Emergency 1
  • 2 - Complex Humanitarian Emergencies and the U.S. National Interest 19
  • 3 - The Bureaucratic Politics of Disasters 33
  • 4 - Nongovernmental Organizations 56
  • 5 - The United Nations and the International Committee of the Red Cross 76
  • 6 - The U.S. Military and Complex Humanitarian Emergencies 105
  • 7 - The Policy Influence of the News Media 124
  • 8 - On Strategy 140
  • Conclusion: The Problem of Political Will 169
  • Notes 173
  • Bibliography 180
  • Index 185
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 192

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.