Understanding Macbeth: A Student Casebook to Issues, Sources, and Historical Documents

By Faith Nostbakken | Go to book overview

Preface

Understanding Macbeth could not have evolved to its final present form without the good will and assistance of other people. I extend my heartfelt thanks to Linda Woodbridge for providing me the initial opportunity and inspiration to write this book. I gratefully acknowledge Rick Bowers for the enthusiasm and critical eye with which he responded to each chapter, bringing his share of gentle encouragement to the work-in-progress. I owe an immeasurable debt to Heather Holtslander, who generously proffered her time and skills to transcribe a large portion of the manuscript from my tape-recorded muttering when tendinitis crippled both my arms during virtually the entire duration of this project. Without her help and resourcefulness, someone else would likely have authored this book.

Others deserve recognition for their kind offerings, from research access across the globe and through the Internet, to patient ears and inspirational ideas. I thank especially Carol Everest, Maxine Hancock, Kim McLean-Fiander, and Arlette Zinck. To these friends and many more, I can say that they play a large part in my continued efforts to cope and achieve through debilitating injuries and prolonged illness.

I also acknowledge and thank my parents for unknowingly providing me--among countless other gifts--my earliest introduction

-xiii-

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Understanding Macbeth: A Student Casebook to Issues, Sources, and Historical Documents
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Greenwood Press "Literature in Context" Series ii
  • Title Page - Understanding Macbeth a Student Casebook to Issues, Sources, and Historical Documents iii
  • Publication/Copyright Page iv
  • Dedication Page vii
  • Contents ix
  • Preface xiii
  • Introduction xv
  • Note xviii
  • 1 - Dramatic Analysis 1
  • Suggested Readings 12
  • Conclusion 20
  • Suggested Readings 22
  • Note 22
  • 2 - Historical Context 23
  • Suggested Readings 54
  • Conclusion 80
  • Suggested Readings 83
  • Conclusion 111
  • Suggested Readings 114
  • 3 - Performance and Interpretation 115
  • Conclusion 123
  • Suggested Readings 125
  • Note 140
  • Conclusion 150
  • Suggested Readings 152
  • Conclusion 159
  • Suggested Readings 162
  • Note 163
  • 4 - Contemporary Applications 165
  • Suggested Readings 184
  • Conclusion 191
  • Conclusion 205
  • Suggested Readings 207
  • Conclusion 216
  • Conclusion 224
  • Suggested Readings 227
  • Index 229
  • About the Author 237
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