Acknowledgments

*

One of the greatest pleasures in completing a book is the opportunity to thank publicly those individuals who over the years have helped make it possible. Michael Soper first excited my interest in history and alerted me to the possibility of an academic career (thus saving the world from one more American lawyer). Stanford Lehmberg and Josef Altholz have both taught me a great deal about the history of the British Isles. From Peter Stansky I have learned much, not only concerning the history of modern Britain but also the graciousness that academics can and should represent. Thomas Metcalf and Joseph Hamburger have been kind enough to share their expertise on British India and the utilitarians, respectively. Dietmar Rothermund has provided me with opportunities to vent my ideas in the congenial yet challenging setting of the South Asia Institute of Heidelberg University. To Martin Moir I owe a special debt for generous assistance in deciphering Mill's place in the bureaucracy of the East India Company. Finally, David Lelyveld has been my mentor in all the best senses of that term, inspiring me to explore the Indian side of the imperial experience while encouraging me to complete this study of Mill. It is largely to the good influences of these scholars that this book owes its merits; any failings, of course, are mine alone.

Several institutions have contributed to the completion of this project as well. The University of Minnesota Graduate School provided funding for my first research visit to the India Office Library and Records. The American Institute of Indian Studies awarded me a junior fellowship for research in India on a slightly different topic that resulted in important material for this book. The American Council of Learned Societies funded

-vii-

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John Stuart Mill and India
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter I James Mill and India 7
  • Chapter 2 J. S. Mill's Education and the Education of India 28
  • Chapter 3 an Empire of Opinion 51
  • Chapter 4 Princes and Progress 87
  • Chapter 5 an Empire of Reform 126
  • Chapter 6 J. S. Mill and the Imperial Experience 169
  • Appendix 209
  • Reference Matter 217
  • Notes 219
  • Works Cited 259
  • Index 271
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