Management Analysis in Public Organizations: History, Concepts, and Techniques

By Ray C. Oman; Stephen L. Damours et al. | Go to book overview

Foreword

As organizations grow larger and accordingly more complex, the need for management analysis and management analysts has become increasingly important to good management. While the profession--and it clearly is one--has been practiced in the United States and elsewhere for well over half a century, there have been no authoritative books on the subject. Now there is one.

Management Analysis in Public Organizations: History, Concepts, and Techniques provides a very useful guide to the theory and practice of the field, and it fills a void long overlooked. Dr. Oman and his associates are practitioners with considerable experience as well as adjunct teachers, so their book contains a variety of practical approaches as well as theoretical justifications for the assignments they undertake.

No one knows how dependent the large organization, particularly the large public organization, is on its management analysts (there are over 17,000 in the federal government alone), but the profession has evolved logically--and successfully--from the "organization and methods examiners" who first appeared in the Ministry of the Treasury in Great Britain in the early 1900s. It has since that time embraced and included specific approaches contributed by industrial engineers, performance budgeting, organization development, productivity measurement, program evaluation, and, more recently, total quality management (TQM). It gives appropriate emphasis to the use of computers from a management and analytical point of view. As a guide to the continuing need for organization improvement, the authors have filled a void in the structuring and operation of the large, modern organi

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