Cold War Patriot and Statesman, Richard M. Nixon

By Leon Friedman; William F. Levantrosser | Go to book overview

9
The Making of the All-Volunteer Armed Force

MARTIN ANDERSON

One of the most lasting legacies of Richard Nixon's presidency was the fundamental change he wrought in the defense manpower policy of the United States. Turning away from the heavy hand of conscription, on which we had relied strongly since the beginning of World War II to raise our armed forces, President Nixon embarked on a bold course--gambling that enough Americans would see that actively participating in the defense of this country was honorable enough, and important enough, that they would of their own free will enlist and serve their country. Nixon's new manpower policy has been strikingly successful, confounding the dire predictions of military weakness and social problems put forth by his critics. It has been successful even beyond the most optimistic hopes of many of his supporters.

The first responsibility of any president is the national security of the nation. Today we have a large, powerful armed force that--judged by the most important criterion, combat capability--can do what it is supposed to do: deter potential attackers and fight if necessary. The experience of the last fifteen years has shown us that men and women who have freely chosen a military career are, on balance, a more effective fighting force than one that is part volunteer, part forced service. And beyond that Nixon's new manpower policy achieved something precious and rare in the post-Vietnam years. Once again the military is an honorable profession.

When the United States abolished the military draft in the early 1970s it was the first time in its history that we had deliberately adopted a national policy of an all-volunteer, large peacetime armed force. Since then millions of young men have had the power to choose whether and how they would serve their country.

-171-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Cold War Patriot and Statesman, Richard M. Nixon
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Political Science ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface ix
  • Part I - Foreign Policy Initiatives 1
  • Appendix 34
  • Notes 38
  • 7 Peace or Oil. The Nixon Administration and Its Middle East Policy Choices 119
  • References 135
  • Part II. The Foreign Policy Process 155
  • 9 The Making of the All-Volunteer Armed Force 171
  • 10 The Nixon Doctrine as History and Portent 187
  • Notes 209
  • 13 Nixon Versus the Congress: The War Powers Resolution, 1973 267
  • APPENDIX B 285
  • APPENDIX B 288
  • 14 The War Powers Resolution: An Intersection of Law and Politics 291
  • Notes 316
  • DIRECTORS' MESSAGE 331
  • Index 357
  • About the Editors and Contributors 371
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 384

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.