Cold War Patriot and Statesman, Richard M. Nixon

By Leon Friedman; William F. Levantrosser | Go to book overview

13
Nixon Versus the Congress: The War Powers Resolution, 1973

PHILIP J. BRIGGS

"The congressional bombing cutoff, coupled with the limitation placed on the President by the War Powers Resolution in November 1973, set off a string of events that led to the Communist takeover in Cambodia and, on April 30, 1975, the North Vietnamese conquest of South Vietnam."1 So stated Richard M. Nixon, thirty-seventh president of the United States, in what is arguably one of the strongest indictments ever leveled by a president against the Congress in the formulation of foreign policy.

The following case study will examine the context, issues, and political positions taken by leading members of the congressional and executive branches of government in the development and enactment of the War Powers Resolution, which placed restrictions on the president's ability to "make war." A final section will summarize and evaluate why passage of this act occurred despite the president's veto.


THE CONSTITUTIONAL SETTING

Beginning with the Constitutional Convention of 1787 in Philadelphia where the war power was briefly discussed on August 17, a determination was made empowering the Congress to "declare" war, with the president retaining the power to "make" war as recorded:

"To make war"

Mr. Pinkney opposed the vesting this power in the Legislature. Its proceedings were too slow. It wd. meet but once a year. The Hs. of Reps. would be too numerous for such

-267-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Cold War Patriot and Statesman, Richard M. Nixon
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Political Science ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface ix
  • Part I - Foreign Policy Initiatives 1
  • Appendix 34
  • Notes 38
  • 7 Peace or Oil. The Nixon Administration and Its Middle East Policy Choices 119
  • References 135
  • Part II. The Foreign Policy Process 155
  • 9 The Making of the All-Volunteer Armed Force 171
  • 10 The Nixon Doctrine as History and Portent 187
  • Notes 209
  • 13 Nixon Versus the Congress: The War Powers Resolution, 1973 267
  • APPENDIX B 285
  • APPENDIX B 288
  • 14 The War Powers Resolution: An Intersection of Law and Politics 291
  • Notes 316
  • DIRECTORS' MESSAGE 331
  • Index 357
  • About the Editors and Contributors 371
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 384

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.