Inside Doctoring: Stages and Outcomes in the Professional Development of Physicians

By Robert H. Coombs; D. Scott May et al. | Go to book overview

Sorcerer's Apprentice: Memoirs of a Medical Student

John A. McKinnon


I

The first-year medical student is a self-conscious, unprepossessing creature: more man-on-the-street than physician, more ignorant and unable than he ever will be again, he is an eager, nervous neophyte, an incompetent in a white coat. And this white coat is his paradox and riddle, expressing a wish and a promise but not yet the reality of "physician."

It is conventional wisdom that a physician is a person in a long white robe who heals the sick, walks on water, and makes enough bread to feed a multitude. In contradistinction, civilians, i.e., patients, are ignorant and precariously mortal creatures who don't. There remains, between these clear extremes, confusion. For, neither fish nor fowl, traditionally poor as a churchmouse and yet privileged in some ways like a physician, what is a medical student? There was no clear answer for me this year, and so the year's toil in the classroom and even its moments of conceptual clarity occurred in a sunlit foreground. In the background shadows slouched this unsettling ambiguity.

____________________
The first-year's memoir, "A Neophyte's Notes on the Rites of Initiation" was republished in WHO Dialogue OMS, Magazine of the Geneva Staff, World Health Organization, April 1973. Excerpts from all four were published as the cover story in The New Physician, November 1977.
This chapter began as four memoirs written at the end of each of the author's years in medical school ( 1972-75) and published in the Case Western Reserve University Medical Alumni Bulletin. More than a decade later the author has cut length and clarified sense, but has tried to restrain the natural impulse of age to revise the past.

-43-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Inside Doctoring: Stages and Outcomes in the Professional Development of Physicians
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 304

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.