Harry S. Truman: The Man from Independence

By William F. Levantrosser | Go to book overview

7
The Development of Economic
Warfare Against the Soviet Union in
the Truman Administration

David W. Folts

Former Secretary of State Alexander Haig in the spring of 1982 stated that trade was an often neglected lever in East-West relations. John Lewis Gaddis in his book Strategies of Containment: A Critical Appraisal of Postwar American National Security Policy barely mentioned trade as an element of containment until the Nixon administration. Revisionist historians have concentrated on the "lost loan application" and Truman's halting of Lend-Lease. The implementation of economic warfare against the Soviet Union by the Truman administration has been ignored by historians and forgotten by policy makers.

Most members of the Truman administration agreed that trade could be an important element in East-West relations. There were, however, sharp disagreements as to whether this "tool" should be used positively or negatively. These differences generally reflected more deeply held views as to the basic nature of United States-Soviet relations. Those who saw the Soviet Union as a rival great power, with whom some cooperation was necessary if peace were to prevail, wanted trade used as a positive inducement. On the other hand, those who felt coexistence of the two systems was impossible urged that trade be used as a weapon to defeat the Soviet Union. There was also a third view, namely that selective means of economic warfare could be used not to defeat the Soviet Union but to modify its behavior in desired directions. While in principle this view seemed closer to the "positive" group, in practice it was much closer to the "negative" group, for it emphasized the withholding of trade as a means of bringing about change.

One difference, which arose between groups two and three, was how to justify a policy of economic warfare vis-a-vis the United States' espousal of free trade. Group three thought it important to square the circle of encouraging free trade while engaging in economic warfare against the Soviet Union, particularly as it

-111-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Harry S. Truman: The Man from Independence
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 438

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.