Harry S. Truman: The Man from Independence

By William F. Levantrosser | Go to book overview

mental machinery for achieving that goal. 33 Subsequent events vindicated the far-sightedness of his policy, but that was forgotten in the turmoil surrounding the revision of national labor policy. What was not forgotten was that he had advocated the retention of price and wage controls. That recollection was to have a significant impact on the formulation of the emergency disputes procedures of the Taft-Hartley Act, and, later, it would seriously impede and ultimately destroy his efforts to implement a stabilization policy during the Korean War.


NOTES
1.
On the formation, history, and activities of the Board, see United States Department of Labor, The Termination Report of the National War Labor Board ( Washington, D.C., 1947) and George W. Taylor, Government Regulation of Industrial Relations ( New York, 1948), Chapter 4.
2.
See "The Wartime Industry-Labor Conference of December 17-23, 1941" in Termination Report, Volume 2, Appendix K-3, p. 1038.
3.
Taylor, Government Regulation of Industrial Relations, p. 196.
4.
See especially, "Dissenting Opinion of the Employer Members of the National War Labor Board, Humble Oil Case, April 1, 1944," Termination Report, Volume 2, p. 358.
5.
See Labor-Management Charter adopted March 28, 1945 subscribed to by William Green , president of the A. F. of L., Philip Murray, president of C.I.O., and Eric Johnston, president of the United States Chamber of Commerce reproduced in the American Federation of Labor News Service, April 3, 1945; Third Quarterly Report of the Director of War Mobilization and Reconversion, June 30, 1945, H. Doc. No. 250, 79th Cong. 1 Sess.; C.I.O. News, August 20, 1945; New York Times, September 4, 1945. See also "Address at the Opening Session of the Labor-Management Conference, November 5, 1945," The Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States: Harry S. Truman, 1945 ( Washington, D.C., 1961), p. 460.
6.
"Statement by the President Proposing Measures to Insure Industrial Peace in the Reconversion Period, August 16, 1945," Truman Papers, 1945, p. 220.
7.
E. O. 9599, 10 F. R. 10155.
8.
"Special message to the Congress Presenting a Twenty-one Point Program for the Reconversion Period, September 6, 1945." Truman Papers, 1945, pp. 263-309.
9.
See Problems and Policies of Dispute Settlement and Wage Stabilization During World War II, United States Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics Bulletin, Number 1009.
10.
E. O. 9617, 10 F. R. 11929. The actual transfer of the Board was preceded by a rather lengthy dispute between the Secretary and the Board. See "Was the Labor Crisis Necessary?", The Saturday Evening Post, January 26, 1946; George W. Taylor, "Voluntarism in Wartime Labor Relations," The General Magazine and Historical Chronicle, University of Pennsylvania General Alumni Society, April 1946; "Board Statement of Policy in Handling Dispute Cases, August 28, 1945," Termination Report, Volume 2, pp. 797-98.
11.
The Labor-Management Conference assembled in Washington on November 5, 1945, over two and a half months after the President announced his intention to call it. In contrast, the 1941 Conference assembled just nine days after the attack on Pearl Harbor.

-287-

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