Facing Social Revolution: The Personal Journey of a Quaker Economist

By Jack Powelson; Jim Corbett et al. | Go to book overview

Afterword
The Creative Tension in Being a Quaker Economist

by Kenneth Boulding

As another Quaker economist - a somewhat rare breed - I have read Jack Powelson's "personal journey" with great interest and sympathy. It is indeed a modem version of the classic Quaker journal which brings out dramatically something I have felt in my own life, the "creative tension" between two cultures. One is the intimate, highly personal but demanding culture of the Society of Friends, with its roots in the Judeo-Christian phylum, as Teilhard de Chardin called it, as it evolves through recorded history. The other is that of the professional economics community, also with deep roots in Christian Europe, but branching out from the eighteenth-century Enlightenment with its dominating emphasis on the search for truth, that is, images in the mind which correspond to some real world.

These two cultures intersect, at times tortuously, as Jack Powelson has found out. The Quaker movement resisted domination by authority and insisted on testing Truth through personal experience. "This I knew experimentally," said George Fox. "You will say Christ saith this and the Apostles say this, but what can'st Thou say?" asked Margaret Fell. But the Quaker search for Truth also corresponded to the four moral principles around which the scientific community has been built: (1) CURIOSITY: what is the world really like? (2) VERACITY: truth-telling, and

-133-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Facing Social Revolution: The Personal Journey of a Quaker Economist
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 152

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.