Curriculum Strategies: Social Skills Intervention for Young African-American Males

By George R. Taylor | Go to book overview
Save to active project

1
Introduction

The severity and complexity of urban education problems have become so widely publicized that they may be considered common knowledge. It is readily recognized that there are many deep-rooted problems facing the educational system today. Problems plaguing the urban schools include drugs, violence, outdated equipment, apathy, low expectations by educators and students, classism, racism, and communities that do not seem to care. Schools and school districts are ill equipped to address and resolve all the problems and challenges faced with daily ( Wright, 1992).

A concerted community effort is needed to reverse the present trend. Interagency cooperation from the various human services departments is needed, headed by the school. Basic physical, social and emotional problems must be addressed, minimized, reduced, or eliminated before children can be successfully educated.

Many deprived Black male children reside in substandard environments where they are denied appropriate mental, physical and social stimulation. The culture and life styles of these communities impede normal growth and development in several key areas of functioning ( Matsueda & Heines, 1987; Butler O., 1989; Hatch & Gardner, 1988; Tomlinson, 1988). The impact of these negative cultural and life experiences have resulted in some alarming statistics.

Throughout history, many African-American males have faced adverse conditions. Wright ( 1992) reported that the African-American males in America continue to be that of an endangered species. It is apparent from statistical data that the African American community is in a crisis. For example, Shade and Edwards, ( 1987, p.123) have

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Curriculum Strategies: Social Skills Intervention for Young African-American Males
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 182

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?