Curriculum Strategies: Social Skills Intervention for Young African-American Males

By George R. Taylor | Go to book overview

3
Behavioral Styles of Young African- American Males

As indicated earlier, many young African-American males have not mastered the social skills needed to be successful at school and within the larger community, resulting in frequent conflicts between the children and school on what is considered appropriate behavior. Much of this confusion can be attributed to the school's failure to understand the impact of various cultural styles on learning. Cultural values influence the behavior of individuals. For example, young African- American males' cultural groups.

The powerful influence on cultural systems on cognitive style and behavior must be recognized and integrated into the instructional program of young African-American males ( Hilliard, 1989). Curriculum planners must recognize that no one behavioral instructional strategy is appropriate for intervention. Rather, strategies should be selected based upon children's abilities and assessed needs as discussed in Chapter 4.

Some of the learning preferences found to be characteristic of African-American learners include: (1) emphasize group cooperation; (2) value harmony with nature; (3) accept affective expression; (4) tend to be holistic or Gestalt thinkers; (5) perceive the field as responding to the person and as possibly having a life of its own; (6) use strong, colorful expressions; (7) require that relevant concepts have special or personal relevance; (8) use language that is dependent upon unique context and many interactional characteristics of the communicants -- time and place, on inflection, muscular movements, and nonverbal cues; (9) prefer learning material that has a human, social content and is characterized by fantasy and humor; and (10) perceived

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