Curriculum Strategies: Social Skills Intervention for Young African-American Males

By George R. Taylor | Go to book overview
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5
Direct Intervention Techniques for Teaching Social Skills

Intervention should reflect the assessed social skills needs of young African-American males. For this purposes, teacher-made checklists may be used as outlined in Chapter 4. Several approaches may be used to promote the pro-social skills of young African-American males.

McGinnis and Goldstein, ( 1984) supported the concept of direct instruction of social skills, recommending modeling, role playing, practice, and feedback as principal procedures and techniques to teach social skills. Additional instruction using the techniques discussed in this chapter can facilitate the teaching of social skills through direct instruction.

"Direct instruction" implies that the teacher is directly intervening to bring about a desired change. Directed instruction is to be used with any subject area to assist children in learning basic skills, as well as employing the concept of task analysis (step-by-step sequence of learning task).


DIRECT INSTRUCTION FRAMEWORK

Bandura ( 1977) provided us with the conceptual framework for using direct instruction, advancing the concepts of Social Learning Theory and Behavioral Modeling. He advocated that much of what we learned is through modeling from observing others. Information that is carefully and systematically gained through modeling may be transferred to other academic, social, and nonacademic functions. Specific techniques for using effective modeling strategies will be delineated later in this chapter.


Skillstreaming

Skillstreaming is a comprehensive social skill program developed by McGinnis and Goldsetin ( 1984). 1 Social skills are clustered in several

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