Curriculum Strategies: Social Skills Intervention for Young African-American Males

By George R. Taylor | Go to book overview

9
Summary

It is commonly thought that young children react to social conflict using different standards than adults. DiMartino ( 1990) study refuted this myth, however. His study showed that areas of social conflict in this experiment included: (1) morality, (2) social convention, (3) safety, and (4) institutional rules.

The same premise may be applied to young African-American males, since all children basically precede through the same social developmental stages; however, some young African-American males appear to be at the highest risk for social development. Studies have shown that at-risk young African-American males attained the lowest average on academic achievement scores and were over-represented in categories such as retained students, school drop-outs, suspended and expelled students, and referral to special education. These findings confirm that young African-American males are at risk during the early elementary grades.

A significant number of young African-American males are educated in public schools located in urban communities, many of which do not provide good environments in which to educate these boys. Thus, a multitude of problems work against the boys receiving appropriate education. (1) The average young African-American male at risk lives with a single parent whose income is below or at the poverty level. This parent is frequently female. (2) Many young African-American males are exposed daily to violence and physical and drug abuse. (3) Many of the boys receive inadequate nutrition and health care. Combined, these factors contribute to many mental, social, and physical problems that impede successful academic and social development.

Holland ( 1989) summed up the plight of young African-American males by stating that drastic reforms must be made in urban education.

-129-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Curriculum Strategies: Social Skills Intervention for Young African-American Males
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 182

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.