Politics and the Courts: Toward a General Theory of Public Law

By Barbara M. Yarnold | Go to book overview

Preface

I would like to sincerely thank those who made this work possible. In graduate school, I was fortunate to work with two inspiring political scientists, Andrew McFarland and Lettie Wenner. I received a doctoral degree in public policy analysis/political science in 1988 from the University of Illinois at Chicago.

I drafted most of this book in my first year as an assistant professor of public administration at Florida International University, in North Miami, Florida. The reduced teaching load (two courses per semester) assisted me enormously in this endeavor, as did other material resources and the positive reinforcement of Dr. Allan Rosenbaum, dean of the School of Public Affairs; Dr. Harvey Averch, chairman of the department of public administration; the support staff at the university; and my friends and colleagues. Pauline M. Broderick also tirelessly and enthusiastically prepared an excellent index for this text.

Of course, I would not have embarked on this work had I not been motivated by love for humanity. To a great extent, I owe this to my family: Helen Marie Yarnold, my mother; Irena Maria Suszko, my aunt; Susan Maria Yarnold, my sister; and my brothers, Paul Richard Yarnold, Ph.D., Charles Nicholas Yarnold, James Alexander Yarnold, and Jack Christopher Yarnold.

Also, I dedicate this to the memory of my deceased father, James Knapps Yarnold, Ph.D., a dedicated father and scholar; and to my deceased grandparents, especially Stanislawa and Micolaj Suszko, who labored intensely so that their grandchildren might have a glimpse of hope.

-xi-

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